Discussion:
Consider a black hole with a mass of 4 x 10^20 Kg
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s***@gmail.com
2019-05-23 21:51:04 UTC
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Consider a black hole with a mass of 4 x 10^20 Kg

The radius would be about 594 nanometers

The temperature would be about 92.6 degrees F

the surface gravity (a force) would be about 7.6 x 10^22 m/s^2

it would last a long time, say 1.7 x 10^38 years

Luminosity would be dim dim dim at 2.22 x 10-9 Watt

So, how close could you get without being sucked in? What would be a safe distance?

Perhaps you could estimate using Newton's inverse square law.
john
2019-05-24 00:22:45 UTC
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Fantasy
Sergeio
2019-05-24 01:48:59 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Consider a black hole with a mass of 4 x 10^20 Kg
The radius would be about 594 nanometers
The temperature would be about 92.6 degrees F
the surface gravity (a force) would be about 7.6 x 10^22 m/s^2
it would last a long time, say 1.7 x 10^38 years
Luminosity would be dim dim dim at 2.22 x 10-9 Watt
So, how close could you get without being sucked in?
you will always get sucked in at any distance,
unless you have a powered space ship to provide acceleration away from it.

so, the solution is a curve on a 2d axis of power or acceleration
required distance. (what is missing is the distance and how much
acceleration you have for a specific answer)


What would be a safe distance?

none! unless you can generate 1g all the time... etc.
Post by s***@gmail.com
Perhaps you could estimate using Newton's inverse square law.
interesting in the movie intersteller, was time slowing down on a planet
surface near a black hole... (excellent movie)

would that affect the amount of accelleration you need over a time
interval to get away from a black hole ?

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