Discussion:
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.
(too old to reply)
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.

I never see the Start Screen (Metro), by the way.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
<PRE Style='Font-Family: OCR A !important;'><big><big> 
Post by unknown
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.
I never see the Start Screen (Metro), by the way.
Start Killer (StartKiller.COM) removes Win10's Start Button.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 17:07:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.

This is an undeniable historic fact. Microsoft commissioned psychological
experts ($$$) to observe the behavior of test subjects representing the common
user, i.e. retards. After intensive study the conclusion was that a
"Start" button or menu was essential in allowing access for the common
user, i.e. retards.

So what's Jeffie, the retard, gonna do without his Start Menu? He will,
like all retards, just sit there and stare at the empty screen with his
mouth hanging open while drooling all over his shirt.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 17:22:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
Is that so...
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
gilber34
2015-08-04 19:31:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
Is that so...
Microsoft is composed of 3rd world mental retards doing contract work,
everyone has known that for years.

There are vast areas of code in Win8 and Win10 that no one knows how it
works, because the turnover rate of Microsoft software people is in the
60% to 75% range.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by gilber34
Microsoft is composed of 3rd world mental retards
doing contract work, everyone has known that for years.
There are vast areas of code in Win8 and Win10
that no one knows how it works, because the turnover rate
of Microsoft software people is in the 60% to 75% range.
I doubt that _all_ managers/programmers are shit.

You don't have to use old code, you can/should rewrite it;
in fact, they often do so. Case in point:

My C# macros, to automate Visual Studio 2015:

Jeff-Relf.Me/Macros.HTM

Yes, I had to rewrite my VS_2010 macros;
but it's nice to have them in C# now,
instead of "Visual Basic for Applications".

Also, now I can write extensions too.
Overall, it's been a wonderful improvement.
gilber34
2015-08-04 19:53:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by gilber34
Microsoft is composed of 3rd world mental retards
doing contract work, everyone has known that for years.
There are vast areas of code in Win8 and Win10
that no one knows how it works, because the turnover rate
of Microsoft software people is in the 60% to 75% range.
I doubt that _all_ managers/programmers are shit.
it is not that they are shit,
it is cost control for microsoft,
coupled with having to work 50 hour weeks or more, a no life at home thing.
burn them out and don't give them much of a raise.
Post by unknown
You don't have to use old code, you can/should rewrite it;
Jeff-Relf.Me/Macros.HTM
Yes, I had to rewrite my VS_2010 macros;
but it's nice to have them in C# now,
instead of "Visual Basic for Applications".
Also, now I can write extensions too.
Overall, it's been a wonderful improvement.
that is good idea
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by gilber34
Post by unknown
I doubt that _all_ managers/programmers are shit.
it is not that they are shit,
it is cost control for microsoft,
coupled with having to work 50 hour weeks or more,
a no life at home thing.
burn them out and don't give them much of a raise.
Programming is fun !
There's _nothing_ that I'd rather be doing.

As for money, who cares ?

Once you have the necessities,
-- and we _all_ do, thanks to the welfare state --
everything else is just trite hedonism.

Quite Trite.

I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
gilber34
2015-08-04 22:08:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by gilber34
Post by unknown
I doubt that _all_ managers/programmers are shit.
it is not that they are shit,
it is cost control for microsoft,
coupled with having to work 50 hour weeks or more,
a no life at home thing.
burn them out and don't give them much of a raise.
Programming is fun !
There's _nothing_ that I'd rather be doing.
As for money, who cares ?
Once you have the necessities,
-- and we _all_ do, thanks to the welfare state --
everything else is just trite hedonism.
Quite Trite.
I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
"women" - better to move to the EU, South America, Russia, or Eastern
Europe, Australia, New Zealand, etc, for pay for service.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 22:13:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by gilber34
Post by unknown
I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
"women" - better to move to the EU, South America, Russia, or Eastern
Europe, Australia, New Zealand, etc, for pay for service.
He has a woman. Her name is Cortana.

All Microsoft needs now is a gay digital assistant, say Cory, and they
cannot lose.
gilber34
2015-08-04 23:42:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by gilber34
Post by unknown
I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
"women" - better to move to the EU, South America, Russia, or Eastern
Europe, Australia, New Zealand, etc, for pay for service.
He has a woman. Her name is Cortana.
All Microsoft needs now is a gay digital assistant, say Cory, and they
cannot lose.
yea, that assistant is gay already;


Loading Image...
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
President DFS would put a bullet in the head of
all welfare recipients that scam society
and refuse to work and pay their own way.
Who do I bill for your bullet, Relf?
You're _not_ the president, nor will you ever be.
You hate "niggers" (your word, not mine); it's extreme.

I don't get welfare, I don't need it.
I've told you this, a hundred times,
but you refuse to believe it.

Socialism, working for the common good, is good;
so good, in fact, that _all_ rich nations do it.
The richer the nation (e.g. Norway), the more they do it.

After that, it's capitalism, to wit:

Trite Hedonism. Quite Trite.

Think about it, DFS, you're a pig.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
I don't get welfare, I don't need it.
I've told you this, a hundred times,
but you refuse to believe it.
" I get food stamps ( $200 / month ) because my income is low,
not because I'm "wacked⋅out ".
Food stamps are welfare.
Is today March 2012 ? ! I had no idea.

What a miserable fuckup you are.
Post by unknown
You're _not_ the president, nor will you ever be.
You hate "niggers" (your word, not mine); it's extreme.
Other than to explain what 'nigger-rigged' means,
I've never used that word on cola.
I doubt that.
You called them "monkeys" and worse.
Please clarify: What do you think of them ? ?
Post by unknown
Socialism, working for the common good, is good;
so good, in fact, that _all_ rich nations do it.
The richer the nation (e.g. Norway), the more they do it.
Trite Hedonism. Quite Trite.
Think about it, DFS, you're a pig.
Not at all - I just live well.
The opposite of how you live: surrounded
by other low-income wackjobs in a boarding house.
I manage a _rooming_ house.

You're a thousand time more "wacked".

I'm happy; you're fucked, way fucked.
A.M
2015-08-05 11:56:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by gilber34
Post by unknown
I doubt that _all_ managers/programmers are shit.
it is not that they are shit,
it is cost control for microsoft,
coupled with having to work 50 hour weeks or more,
a no life at home thing.
burn them out and don't give them much of a raise.
Programming is fun !
There's _nothing_ that I'd rather be doing.
As for money, who cares ?
Once you have the necessities,
-- and we _all_ do, thanks to the welfare state --
everything else is just trite hedonism.
Quite Trite.
I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
You're not married, Jeff? I'm shocked! I would have seen you as the next
Bachelor.
--
A.M
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.M
Post by unknown
I don't want a "roomate" or "wife", by the way;
especially not one that wants me to fund _her_ hedonism.
You're not married, Jeff? I'm shocked!
I would have seen you as the next Bachelor.
"The Bachelor" (on the TV show) is a prissy bottom.
UrbanDictionary.COM/define.php?term=bottom

More marriages would happen if "his women" were dikes.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 14:06:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Programming is fun !
There's _nothing_ that I'd rather be doing.
LOL! You are not programming. You only think that you are programming.

Although you have not given any details, in all likelihood this "programming"
that you mention involves coding in Microsoft C#/.NET.

Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language, is *not* programming.
It is only arranging predetermined classes like a child will arrange
toy blocks.

Real programming involves a low-level language such as C or even assembly
language to create complex digital structures based on fundamental elements
that address some problem. That's not what takes place when employing C#.

Real programming involves an actual insight into and an understanding of
digital principles. That's not what takes place when employing C#.

You are fooling yourself. Using C# for "programming" is analogous to using
a paint-by-numbers kit to produce "art."

Real men use C or assembly.

Pussies use C#.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 14:13:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by unknown
Programming is fun !
There's _nothing_ that I'd rather be doing.
LOL! You are not programming. You only think that you are programming.
Although you have not given any details, in all likelihood this "programming"
that you mention involves coding in Microsoft C#/.NET.
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language, is *not* programming.
It is only arranging predetermined classes like a child will arrange
toy blocks.
Real programming involves a low-level language such as C or even assembly
language to create complex digital structures based on fundamental elements
that address some problem. That's not what takes place when employing C#.
Real programming involves an actual insight into and an understanding of
digital principles. That's not what takes place when employing C#.
You are fooling yourself. Using C# for "programming" is analogous to using
a paint-by-numbers kit to produce "art."
Real men use C or assembly.
Pussies use C#.
Idiot. Plain and simple.
Post by Fabian Russell
"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language, is *not*
programming."
Yet programmers who would wipe the floor with a dimwit like you manage to do
"real programming" with object oriented languages every day.
--
"Another one who seems to think an MD5 sum is an MD5 hash"

Chris Ahlstrom - trying hard to be technical when in reality he once again
has no clue what he's talking about.
Message-ID: <ku2h12$lr3$***@dont-email.me>
9 Aug 2013
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 14:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ezekiel
Yet programmers who would wipe the floor with a dimwit like you manage to do
"real programming" with object oriented languages every day.
That's because real programmers wrote the classes that are then
blindly utilized by the pseudo-programming C# crowd.

If a C# coder had to write his own classes ... forget about it.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 15:06:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Ezekiel
Yet programmers who would wipe the floor with a dimwit like you manage to do
"real programming" with object oriented languages every day.
That's because real programmers wrote the classes that are then
blindly utilized by the pseudo-programming C# crowd.
If a C# coder had to write his own classes ... forget about it.
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks.
Note the "any other object oriented language" part.

So in your tiny mind the person who implements yet another string-class or
hashtable is a "real programmer" and real-man. But the person who uses for
example Java classes to build a transactional distributed data processing
system isn't really a programmer.

In your world idiots who keep re-inventing the same wheel by writing more
string classes, more collection classes, etc are "real programmers." But the
developers who write Libre Office, GIMP, etc are not "real programmers"
because they're only "arranging predetermined classes like a child will
arrange toy blocks."

Like I said before. You're a clueless idiot. Plain and simple.
--
"I've done for example SQL optimization and the reason I could do it better
than the best high level experts can do was because I think in hex and bits
and byte movements. If you know the assembler in detail, you would know what
"select * from employees" would translate into assembler and how different
and yet similar that would be from "select name from employees"

Babbling idiot "7"
March 7, 2012
<qAN5r.607$***@newsfe03.ams2>
Melzzzzz
2015-08-05 15:26:14 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 11:06:40 -0400
Post by Ezekiel
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Ezekiel
Yet programmers who would wipe the floor with a dimwit like you manage to do
"real programming" with object oriented languages every day.
That's because real programmers wrote the classes that are then
blindly utilized by the pseudo-programming C# crowd.
If a C# coder had to write his own classes ... forget about it.
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks.
Note the "any other object oriented language" part.
So in your tiny mind the person who implements yet another
string-class or hashtable is a "real programmer" and real-man. But
the person who uses for example Java classes to build a transactional
distributed data processing system isn't really a programmer.
In your world idiots who keep re-inventing the same wheel by writing
more string classes, more collection classes, etc are "real
programmers." But the developers who write Libre Office, GIMP, etc
are not "real programmers" because they're only "arranging
predetermined classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Like I said before. You're a clueless idiot. Plain and simple.
Actually he is not. I know at least one C# programmer who is not
capable to grasp algorithm if there is no handy class around.
So actually if there is trivial solution to problem, such programmer
would rather use some complex class, which does same thing, but with
bloat, simply because he is not capable to come with algorithm.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 15:29:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 11:06:40 -0400
Post by Ezekiel
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Ezekiel
Yet programmers who would wipe the floor with a dimwit like you manage to do
"real programming" with object oriented languages every day.
That's because real programmers wrote the classes that are then
blindly utilized by the pseudo-programming C# crowd.
If a C# coder had to write his own classes ... forget about it.
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks.
Note the "any other object oriented language" part.
So in your tiny mind the person who implements yet another
string-class or hashtable is a "real programmer" and real-man. But
the person who uses for example Java classes to build a transactional
distributed data processing system isn't really a programmer.
In your world idiots who keep re-inventing the same wheel by writing
more string classes, more collection classes, etc are "real
programmers." But the developers who write Libre Office, GIMP, etc
are not "real programmers" because they're only "arranging
predetermined classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Like I said before. You're a clueless idiot. Plain and simple.
Actually he is not. I know at least one C# programmer who is not
capable to grasp algorithm if there is no handy class around.
So actually if there is trivial solution to problem, such programmer
would rather use some complex class, which does same thing, but with
bloat, simply because he is not capable to come with algorithm.
"I know at least one C# programmer" - your sample of *one* programmer means
nothing.

There are 100's of thousands (perhaps millions) of programmers who use
object oriented languages.
--
(Iterating nodes in an XML document) "kind of defeats the point of XML."

JED the clueless poser
<***@nomad.mishnet>
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 15:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ezekiel
There are 100's of thousands (perhaps millions) of programmers who use
object oriented languages.
Those figures alone are proof of all that I have claimed.

Thanks to OO, the job of the "programmer" is as simple as flipping
hamburgers.

Need a fully functional CRUD-capable web site? Visual Studio will
build one for you in three mouse clicks.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 16:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Ezekiel
There are 100's of thousands (perhaps millions) of programmers who use
object oriented languages.
Those figures alone are proof of all that I have claimed.
Thanks to OO, the job of the "programmer" is as simple as flipping
hamburgers.
Need a fully functional CRUD-capable web site? Visual Studio will
build one for you in three mouse clicks.
You're an idiot. Either that our you do a damn good job of playing one on
Usenet.

According to your tiny little brain - some kid who writes a "string class"
is a real programmer because they implemented a low-level class that's
already been done dozens of times over.

But someone who uses objects to write a SQL engine isn't a programmer. The
person may have written the SQL lexer, which is then fed into a SQL parser
which then generates an optimized execution plan to run the query. But the
person who's capable of writing a complex system like this isn't a "real
programmer" according to an idiot like you because they're doing complex
high-level work using objects instead of writing string classes like "real
programmers" do.

My bet is that you're some junior moron at a software company. No
intelligent person or anyone with experience would say anything as
incredibly ignorant as you did.
Post by Fabian Russell
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks.
LOL. Keep telling yourself that.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 16:11:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ezekiel
But someone who uses objects to write a SQL engine isn't a programmer.
Don't waste time arguing about it. The next new version of C#/.NET
is about to be released with oodles of new OO features.

Forget about family, friends, and life in general. You gotta pass
the new round of certification exams. Then you'll be job secure for
at least six months.

LOL! Microsoft has created an entire generation of patsy pseudo-programmers
to stoke the profits on its server OS and general OS.

Keep slaving for Microsoft, boys. Drink deep the Kool-Aid.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 16:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Ezekiel
But someone who uses objects to write a SQL engine isn't a programmer.
Don't waste time arguing about it. The next new version of C#/.NET
is about to be released with oodles of new OO features.
So? It doesn't affect me or anyone else who doesn't use C#/NET in their job.
Post by Fabian Russell
Forget about family, friends, and life in general. You gotta pass
the new round of certification exams. Then you'll be job secure for
at least six months.
What certification exams do I gotta pass? Is that similar to the
"certification exams" that Redhat has?

http://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification

The certification is there for anyone who wants/needs this but that's all it
is.
Post by Fabian Russell
LOL! Microsoft has created an entire generation of patsy
pseudo-programmers
to stoke the profits on its server OS and general OS.
Meanwhile you're one of the generation of ignorant idiots who thinks that
"real programmers" don't use object oriented languages.
Post by Fabian Russell
Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks.
Keep slaving for Microsoft, boys. Drink deep the Kool-Aid.
I don't work or slave for Microsoft. But I'm experienced and intelligent
enough to understand that some very sophisticated software is written using
object oriented languages. Something that's obviously too difficult for a
moron such as you to understand.
--
"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language, is *not* programming.
It is only arranging predetermined classes like a child will arrange toy
blocks."

Some idiot named Fabian Russell
Melzzzzz
2015-08-05 16:51:00 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 12:37:05 -0400
Post by Ezekiel
Post by Fabian Russell
Keep slaving for Microsoft, boys. Drink deep the Kool-Aid.
I don't work or slave for Microsoft. But I'm experienced and
intelligent enough to understand that some very sophisticated
software is written using object oriented languages.
We are talking about C#. Same lame techinques don't work as well on
C++ ;)
Said C# programmer couldn't pool out C++ libs, he simply couldn't use
them and algorithm was beyond his comprehension ;)

Something that's
Post by Ezekiel
obviously too difficult for a moron such as you to understand.
I agree with him. C# is for "programmers"
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 16:59:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 12:37:05 -0400
Post by Ezekiel
Post by Fabian Russell
Keep slaving for Microsoft, boys. Drink deep the Kool-Aid.
I don't work or slave for Microsoft. But I'm experienced and
intelligent enough to understand that some very sophisticated
software is written using object oriented languages.
We are talking about C#. Same lame techinques don't work as well on
C++ ;)
No - that idiot is talking about any object oriented language:

"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Post by Melzzzzz
Said C# programmer couldn't pool out C++ libs, he simply couldn't use
them and algorithm was beyond his comprehension ;)
That's nice for that *one* said C# programmer. I'm sure there's a complete
idiot C++ programmer somewhere and a complete idiot assembly language
programmer somewhere and a complete idiot Java programmer out there too.
It's a big world after all.
Post by Melzzzzz
Something that's
Post by Ezekiel
obviously too difficult for a moron such as you to understand.
I agree with him. C# is for "programmers"
"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."

He's a complete idiot. He's too stupid to realize how ignorant he is.
--
"Linux is the only reason Apple has anything like an App Store."

Some fool named JED - July 26, 2015
<***@nomad.mishnet>
Melzzzzz
2015-08-05 17:04:38 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 12:59:40 -0400
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Melzzzzz
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 12:37:05 -0400
Post by Ezekiel
Post by Fabian Russell
Keep slaving for Microsoft, boys. Drink deep the Kool-Aid.
I don't work or slave for Microsoft. But I'm experienced and
intelligent enough to understand that some very sophisticated
software is written using object oriented languages.
We are talking about C#. Same lame techinques don't work as well on
C++ ;)
"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Post by Melzzzzz
Said C# programmer couldn't pool out C++ libs, he simply couldn't
use them and algorithm was beyond his comprehension ;)
That's nice for that *one* said C# programmer. I'm sure there's a
complete idiot C++ programmer somewhere and a complete idiot assembly
language programmer somewhere and a complete idiot Java programmer
out there too. It's a big world after all.
Post by Melzzzzz
Something that's
Post by Ezekiel
obviously too difficult for a moron such as you to understand.
I agree with him. C# is for "programmers"
"Coding in C#, or any other object oriented language,
is *not* programming. It is only arranging predetermined
classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Hm. Any other? Nah...
Post by Fabian Russell
He's a complete idiot. He's too stupid to realize how ignorant he is.
Actually OO is much harder to design,program and understand then C &
assembler.
C is so popular because of it's simplicity to learn and grasp.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 17:48:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
Actually OO is much harder to design,program and understand then C &
assembler.
Can God make a rock so heavy that he can't lift it?

Well, man has succeeded in making a programming language so
needlessly complex that he can't fully utilize it.

I stress the term "needlessly." Higher orders of useless abstraction
seems to be the new testosterone supplement.
Post by Melzzzzz
C is so popular because of it's simplicity to learn and grasp.
Thus greatly relieving the programmer and allowing him to focus
on problem analysis which is the essence of programming. Coding
is only, at best, a secondary activity.

Anything that can be done in C++ can be done in C. There is
absolutely no need for it.

After all, an "object" is only a glorified (deified?) subroutine.
Melzzzzz
2015-08-05 18:07:37 UTC
Permalink
On 5 Aug 2015 17:48:23 GMT
Post by Fabian Russell
After all, an "object" is only a glorified (deified?) subroutine.
Object is struct with associated functions that take said struct as
first parameter. Other thing is that object can have associate function
pointer table called vtable.
Other thing is that object member variables can have restricted access
and special member functions (eg constructor).
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 18:09:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
Object is struct with associated functions that take said struct as
first parameter. Other thing is that object can have associate function
pointer table called vtable.
Other thing is that object member variables can have restricted access
and special member functions (eg constructor).
Just like I said. It is a glorified subroutine.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 18:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Melzzzzz
Object is struct with associated functions that take said struct as
first parameter. Other thing is that object can have associate function
pointer table called vtable.
Other thing is that object member variables can have restricted access
and special member functions (eg constructor).
When combined, objects have well defined interfaces and are able to
programatically enforce how those interfaces are used and what code is
allowed to use those interfaces.
Post by Fabian Russell
Just like I said. It is a glorified subroutine.
When all you know is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
--
Post by Fabian Russell
Problem with Chromebooks in the enterprise - when IBM, HP, eBay,
Citi Bank, etc writes an email, internal document or spreadsheet
they don't want Google to see each and every word they write?
Didn't think you had the brains that God gave a cockroach, fsckwit.

How about encrypting things that they don't want others to see?

turdv "thinks" that encryption will magically provide privacy on the docs
and spreadsheets you edit, calculate and spell-check online. Google can
spell-check your document but if it's encrypted they won't be able to read
what they're spell-checking.
Jan 21, 2013
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 18:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Well, man has succeeded in making a programming language so
needlessly complex that he can't fully utilize it.
Ah ha -- the truth comes out -- to hard for you!
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
In your world, idiots who keep re-inventing the wheel,
by writing more string classes, more collection classes, etc.
are "real programmers."
But the developers who write Libre Office, GIMP, etc
are not "real programmers" because they're only "arranging
predetermined classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Like I said before. You're a clueless idiot. Plain and simple.
Actually he is not. I know at least one C# programmer who is not
capable to grasp algorithm if there is no handy class around.
So actually if there is trivial solution to problem, such programmer
would rather use some complex class, which does same thing, but with
bloat, simply because he is not capable to come with algorithm.
What's better: a pen or a pencil ? Salvador Dalí used both.

My extensions to Visual Studio 2015 are written in C#.
Were I to write an extension for FireFox, I'd use JavaScript.
Most of my code is Visual C++ but, mostly, it looks like C.
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 18:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by Melzzzzz
In your world, idiots who keep re-inventing the wheel,
by writing more string classes, more collection classes, etc.
are "real programmers."
But the developers who write Libre Office, GIMP, etc
are not "real programmers" because they're only "arranging
predetermined classes like a child will arrange toy blocks."
Like I said before. You're a clueless idiot. Plain and simple.
Actually he is not. I know at least one C# programmer who is not
capable to grasp algorithm if there is no handy class around.
So actually if there is trivial solution to problem, such programmer
would rather use some complex class, which does same thing, but with
bloat, simply because he is not capable to come with algorithm.
What's better: a pen or a pencil ? Salvador Dalí used both.
My extensions to Visual Studio 2015 are written in C#.
Were I to write an extension for FireFox, I'd use JavaScript.
Most of my code is Visual C++ but, mostly, it looks like C.
The "language" used is rarely an issue. Unless there's some restriction that
VS extensions have to be in C# (or another managed language) or that Emacs
extensions have to be in Lisp, etc.

The work of programming/software development is being able to understand the
problem and to then figuring out a way to solve the problem. Once the
solution is figured out and known - the actual language used to implement
the solution isn't that big of a deal in most cases.
--
Advocate Claim: "(iOS) is A POS that needs over 8 GB of RAM."

Advocate Proof: "iPhone is available in 8GB and 16GB models at Apple Retail
Stores, AT&T Stores or online from AT&T."

A Linux "advocate" that's too stupid to know the difference between RAM and
storage.
Message-ID: <gprqmf$f87$***@news.albasani.net>
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 14:21:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Real men use C or assembly.
Or Pascal or Swift.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
Melzzzzz
2015-08-05 15:02:41 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 09:21:59 -0500
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Real men use C or assembly.
Or Pascal or Swift.
Or PHP or JavaScript...
Ezekiel
2015-08-05 15:26:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melzzzzz
On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 09:21:59 -0500
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Real men use C or assembly.
Or Pascal or Swift.
Or PHP or JavaScript...
A few years back a friend of mine wrote a web-server in bash. A bit odd and
unconventional but it was certainly creative, took some problem solving
skills and got him a job with ITA software (which is now owned by Google).

ITA Software used to have a "programming challenge" on their website.
Interested in a development job... solve one of the programming challenges,
email your code/solution and maybe you'll get an interview.

His web server written in bash was certainly different and interesting
enough to get him in the door. It takes a lot more clever thinking and
problem solving to write a web server in bash than it does to write yet
another string class.
--
"Microsoft Executives deposed in sworn testimony before Courts, in 2005, and
in *every* quarterly SEC filing, that Linux users made up over 17% of all
Internet users with a growth rate of >3% per annum."

Dumb Willy Poaster - repeating the same LIE for YEARS.

08 May 2008 <***@leafnode.amd64.eu>
19 Jul 2009 <ibjbj6-***@jaunty64bit.unbuntulinux.org>
26 Jan 2010 <***@mandriva2010.org>
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 21:20:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Jeff-Relf.Me/Macros.HTM
No one cares about your VS macros. This is a *physics* group.

So how do you use your Windows machine in support of physics?
What kind of scientific plotting/graphics software do you have
installed? What kind of computer algebra and/or numerical
simulation packages do you employ?

Tell us about using Microsoft Windows for physics.
Rock Brentwood
2015-08-04 22:46:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
You don't have to use old code, you can/should rewrite it;
Well OK, there's an idea. I'm in the middle of rewriting AlgLib ... now down to 150,000 lines from where it was before I got a hold of it (300,000+ lines). Wait till I finish crunching down LaPack (all 750,000 lines of it). I just finished crunching down AutoMath yesterday (from 5000 lines to beautifully-laid out 1000 lines) and am in the middle of completely redoing CFront, Indent, Bison, Flex, BYacc/J, VLC, Audacity, DarkWave, having just finally wrapping up a 2-way spectrograph <-> sound convertor.

On UNIX with GCC.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
<PRE Style='Font-Family: OCR A !important;'><big><big> 
Post by unknown
You don't have to use old code, you can/should rewrite it;
Well OK, there's an idea. I'm in the middle of
rewriting AlgLib ... now down to 150,000 lines from
where it was before I got a hold of it (300,000+
lines). Wait till I finish crunching down LaPack (all
750,000 lines of it). I just finished crunching down
AutoMath yesterday (from 5000 lines to
beautifully-laid out 1000 lines) and am in the middle
of completely redoing CFront, Indent, Bison, Flex,
BYacc/J, VLC, Audacity, DarkWave, having just finally
wrapping up a 2-way spectrograph &lt;-> sound convertor.
On UNIX with GCC.
Prove it. Show us your source code.

Here's a sample of my source code:

Jeff-Relf.Me/X.ZIP
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
<PRE Style='Font-Family: OCR A !important;'><big><big> 
Post by Rock Brentwood
Post by unknown
You don't have to use old code, you can/should rewrite it;
Jeff-Relf.Me/Macros.HTM
Well OK, there's an idea. I'm in the middle of
rewriting AlgLib ... now down to 150,000 lines from
where it was before I got a hold of it (300,000+
lines). Wait till I finish crunching down LaPack (all
750,000 lines of it). I just finished crunching down
AutoMath yesterday (from 5000 lines to
beautifully-laid out 1000 lines) and am in the middle
of completely redoing CFront, Indent, Bison, Flex,
BYacc/J, VLC, Audacity, DarkWave, having just finally
wrapping up a 2-way spectrograph &lt;-> sound convertor.
On UNIX with GCC.
Prove it. Show us your source code.

Here's a sample of my source code:

Jeff-Relf.Me/X.ZIP
Rock Brentwood
2015-08-04 22:40:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by gilber34
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
Is that so...
Microsoft is composed of 3rd world mental retards doing contract work,
everyone has known that for years.
There are vast areas of code in Win8 and Win10 that no one knows how it
works, because the turnover rate of Microsoft software people is in the
60% to 75% range.
I've had Windows crash on my present machine in April, February; in 2014 in October, February; in 2013 in December; on a previous machine in February 2014; on an earlier machine in 2013; several other times on other machines.

At a certain point the pattern finally becomes clear ... so that at last I finally remove the problem by removing its cause -- Windows. Now suddenly all those old programming projects and other items on my to do list are finally getting done (on UNIX) where *real* programmers, *real* programs & source code, *real* program libraries can be found in plenitude along with all the tools needed to make your own. None of this mediocrity-ware for Middle America and Point and Click End-User Widget nonsense. Just look at all the stuff on my G++. Try to get PhotoShop (or video editors) to do any of that.

Microsoft is like the Sears or McDonalds of the computer world and any who continue to stick to it date themselves almost as badly as making regular use of the USENET does.
R Kym Horsell
2015-08-04 22:59:44 UTC
Permalink
Rock Brentwood <***@netzero.com> wrote:
...
Post by Rock Brentwood
Microsoft is like the Sears or McDonalds of the computer world and any who continue to stick to it date themselves almost as badly as making regular use of the USENET does.
And here I was thinking USENET predated Windows by 10-20 years.
Must be my poor old mind playing tricks on me again.

--
USENET gives you the ability to be a total turd with no repercussions
other than being called the ass hole that you are.
-- Jim Pennino <***@specsol.spam.sux.com>, 7/22/15 1:33 PM
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 23:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rock Brentwood
Microsoft is like the Sears or McDonalds of the computer world
Don't say "Sears." Sears is a very good retailer with very good stuff.

Microsoft, however, will soon be like the "rent to own" business where
the user will end up paying, in the long term, thousands of dollars for
software that is only worth less than a hundred.
gilber34
2015-08-04 23:45:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Rock Brentwood
Microsoft is like the Sears or McDonalds of the computer world
Don't say "Sears." Sears is a very good retailer with very good stuff.
used to be Sears and Roebuck, when did they off Roebuck ?
Sears owns Kmart, which says something bad about both.
Craftsman tools are ok.
benj
2015-08-05 05:38:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
Is that so...
Yup. It's true Sam. Bill created Win10 personalized just for you!
Get the picture?
--
___ ___ ___ ___
/\ \ /\ \ /\__\ /\ \
/::\ \ /::\ \ /::| | \:\ \
/:/\:\ \ /:/\:\ \ /:|:| | ___ /::\__\
/::\~\:\__\ /::\~\:\ \ /:/|:| |__ /\ /:/\/__/
/:/\:\ \:|__| /:/\:\ \:\__\ /:/ |:| /\__\ \:\/:/ /
\:\~\:\/:/ / \:\~\:\ \/__/ \/__|:|/:/ / \::/ /
\:\ \::/ / \:\ \:\__\ |:/:/ / \/__/
\:\/:/ / \:\ \/__/ |::/ /
\_:/__/ \:\__\ /:/ /
\/__/ \/__/
benj
2015-08-04 17:46:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by unknown
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
This is an undeniable historic fact. Microsoft commissioned psychological
experts ($$$) to observe the behavior of test subjects representing the common
user, i.e. retards. After intensive study the conclusion was that a
"Start" button or menu was essential in allowing access for the common
user, i.e. retards.
So what's Jeffie, the retard, gonna do without his Start Menu? He will,
like all retards, just sit there and stare at the empty screen with his
mouth hanging open while drooling all over his shirt.
I think the way they designed Win10 was the found a bunch of WEBTV users
and had each one tell the way he'd like his OS to work. Done.

Rolf, is just pissed because win10 didn't come preloaded with a deep red
font on a dark brown background.
--
___ ___ ___ ___
/\ \ /\ \ /\__\ /\ \
/::\ \ /::\ \ /::| | \:\ \
/:/\:\ \ /:/\:\ \ /:|:| | ___ /::\__\
/::\~\:\__\ /::\~\:\ \ /:/|:| |__ /\ /:/\/__/
/:/\:\ \:|__| /:/\:\ \:\__\ /:/ |:| /\__\ \:\/:/ /
\:\~\:\/:/ / \:\~\:\ \/__/ \/__|:|/:/ / \::/ /
\:\ \::/ / \:\ \:\__\ |:/:/ / \/__/
\:\/:/ / \:\ \/__/ |::/ /
\_:/__/ \:\__\ /:/ /
\/__/ \/__/
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Fabian_Russell, The Start Menu was born out of research
into how to teach monkey's to communicate with us.

As I said at the start of this thread,
I never see the Start Menu, nor Start Screen.

Instead, I created a new toolbar on the TaskBar and
with the apps I want, in the order I want them.

To order them: "unLock" the TaskBar,
drap the apps around, then lock the TaskBar.

Only the top app's icon is seen on the TaskBar,
screenshot: "Jeff-Relf.Me/MyDesktop.PNG".

The other apps are in the ToolBar's drop_down menu.
Note: I don't use the Desktop, it's blank.

Start Killer (StartKiller.COM) removes Win10's Start Button.
Double-A
2015-08-04 20:54:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Fabian_Russell, The Start Menu was born out of research
into how to teach monkey's to communicate with us.
As I said at the start of this thread,
I never see the Start Menu, nor Start Screen.
Instead, I created a new toolbar on the TaskBar and
with the apps I want, in the order I want them.
To order them: "unLock" the TaskBar,
drap the apps around, then lock the TaskBar.
Only the top app's icon is seen on the TaskBar,
screenshot: "Jeff-Relf.Me/MyDesktop.PNG".
The other apps are in the ToolBar's drop_down menu.
Note: I don't use the Desktop, it's blank.
Start Killer (StartKiller.COM) removes Win10's Start Button.
I heard something about that Microsoft was going to start spying on us with the comera as of Win10! Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google? Do you know about that?

Double-A
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 21:16:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going to start spying on us with
the comera as of Win10! Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.

They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 21:26:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
Is that so...
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
R Kym Horsell
2015-08-04 21:35:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
Is that so...
And Google's search history on evvybody means no-one is anonymous anymore!

--
[From the Project Much files:]
Everything you warmballers say is a lie. We refute each and every one
with references and you all pretend you've heard nothing. And then
simply dismiss anyone with proof as a "denier".
-- Ben Jacoby aka benj, 04/08/2015 08:23
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 21:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by R Kym Horsell
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
Is that so...
And Google's search history on evvybody means no-one is anonymous anymore!
Time to switch to encryption and searches that don't track you. :-)

DuckDuckGo.com
Post by R Kym Horsell
--
[From the Project Much files:]
Everything you warmballers say is a lie. We refute each and every one
with references and you all pretend you've heard nothing. And then
simply dismiss anyone with proof as a "denier".
-- Ben Jacoby aka benj, 04/08/2015 08:23
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
HVAC
2015-08-05 11:57:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by R Kym Horsell
And Google's search history on evvybody means no-one is anonymous anymore!
Time to switch to encryption and searches that don't track you. :-)
DuckDuckGo.com
Lol
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
j***@specsol.spam.sux.com
2015-08-04 21:38:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
Is that so...
Yes, it is, shit for brains, and it has been widely published.

Windows 10 by default even makes your machine a source for the Internet
to download Windows 10; hope you aren't charged by the byte for access.
--
Jim Pennino
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 21:48:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Is that so...
Cartoons must be over. Sammy is posting again.

Yes, that is so.

Microsoft is moving toward a software-as-a-service business model,
and Windows 10 is merely a transition. Soon there will no more Windows
releases. All software will be on Microsoft servers and the user's
machine will be only a "dumb" terminal.

Of course, a dumb terminal does not store data locally. All associated
data will also be on Microsoft's "cloud." Everything. No choice.

So, for a subscription fee ($$$) that guarantees Microsoft income
in perpetuity, the user will get to had over mostly everything.
Most users, being veritable retards, won't know enough about what's
actually happening to object.

In fact, all software companies are moving to subscription-based
SaaS.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 21:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Microsoft is moving toward a software-as-a-service business model,
and Windows 10 is merely a transition. Soon there will no more Windows
releases. All software will be on Microsoft servers and the user's
machine will be only a "dumb" terminal.
You make it sound like a Chromebook. You don't know shit, do you.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 22:08:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
You make it sound like a Chromebook. You don't know shit, do you.
Saying that you know shit is being extremely generous.

Software lasts forever. Software companies do not. The only way to
guarantee a revenue stream is to use a subscription service. Otherwise,
clients are liable to buy your package once and then use it for 20 years.

Photoshop has already gone that route. No more releases to run on
individual owned and controlled workstations. Now, the user must
pay a subscription fee and thus be forever locked in (owned) by a
particular vendor.

Stick to cartoons, Sammy. They are designed for your mentality.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 22:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Sam Wormley
You make it sound like a Chromebook. You don't know shit, do you.
Saying that you know shit is being extremely generous.
Software lasts forever. Software companies do not. The only way to
guarantee a revenue stream is to use a subscription service. Otherwise,
clients are liable to buy your package once and then use it for 20 years.
That's so funny, I can't think of much application software from
twenty years ago still having anything to run on. There are
exceptions--some FORTRAN programs I wrote to do data analysis in
the 1990s still compiles and runs, but the world has moved on.

I must admit I'm still running a calendar program developed at MIT
since before 1991.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 22:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
I can't think of much application software from
twenty years ago still having anything to run on.
How about 20-year-old hardware? There's plenty of that still
around and also lots of folks/companies still running Windows 95.

Furthermore, Microsoft goes to great lengths to maintain compatibility
with older software across its entire line of NT-based OS's.

You'd know this stuff but you only use computers to give the
appearance of being a digital person. That's why you use Chromebook
and Apple exclusively.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-04 23:06:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Sam Wormley
I can't think of much application software from
twenty years ago still having anything to run on.
How about 20-year-old hardware? There's plenty of that still
around and also lots of folks/companies still running Windows 95.
Furthermore, Microsoft goes to great lengths to maintain compatibility
with older software across its entire line of NT-based OS's.
You'd know this stuff but you only use computers to give the
appearance of being a digital person. That's why you use Chromebook
and Apple exclusively.
I'm a Unix guy -- always was and always will be.

exec 5<>/dev/tcp/time.nist.gov/13; cat <&5 & cat >&5; exec 5>&-
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
gilber34
2015-08-04 23:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Sam Wormley
I can't think of much application software from
twenty years ago still having anything to run on.
How about 20-year-old hardware? There's plenty of that still
around and also lots of folks/companies still running Windows 95.
Furthermore, Microsoft goes to great lengths to maintain compatibility
with older software across its entire line of NT-based OS's.
You'd know this stuff but you only use computers to give the
appearance of being a digital person. That's why you use Chromebook
and Apple exclusively.
I'm a Unix guy -- always was and always will be.
exec 5<>/dev/tcp/time.nist.gov/13; cat <&5 & cat >&5; exec 5>&-
Unix'es

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix#/media/File:Unix_history-simple.svg

REM SCO Unix ? I knew the SCO CEO who was doing the lawsuits, the guy
was dishonest from the getgo. No other way to make money, so threaten to
sue. Eventually they expended most all their money, fired the CEO, and
drop the lawsuits. CEO made a ton of money, and got away with it.
R Kym Horsell
2015-08-05 00:22:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Sam Wormley
I can't think of much application software from
twenty years ago still having anything to run on.
How about 20-year-old hardware? There's plenty of that still
around and also lots of folks/companies still running Windows 95.
Furthermore, Microsoft goes to great lengths to maintain compatibility
with older software across its entire line of NT-based OS's.
You'd know this stuff but you only use computers to give the
appearance of being a digital person. That's why you use Chromebook
and Apple exclusively.
I'm a Unix guy -- always was and always will be.
exec 5<>/dev/tcp/time.nist.gov/13; cat <&5 & cat >&5; exec 5>&-
Eek.

IKIDS$HKEX$$


--
[Lysenko's idea,] ironically, that the environment can influence the
phenotype and the genes is terribly old news, no news at all, really[.]
-- Florian Maderspacher, "Lysenko rising", Current Biology V20#19.
gilber34
2015-08-04 22:10:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going to start spying on us with
the comera as of Win10! Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
is that true ?



WSJ today had article that Apple and Google are going to be doing that
with their cellphones
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Quoting:
http://www.wsj.com/articles/apple-and-google-know-what-you-want-before-you-do-1438625660

Apple and Google Know What You Want Before You Do.

New technology for smartphones will monitor activity
and send information before it is requested; locking
in loyal users.

Apple and Google are preparing new smartphone apps
that will monitor and predict users’ activity and
supply information before it is requested.

By Daisuke Wakabayashi and Alistair Barr
Aug. 3, 2015 2:14 p.m. ET 69 COMMENTS

Apple Inc. and Google Inc. are racing to anticipate
the needs of their users.

The technology giants, whose software runs nearly all
of the world’s smartphones, are adding features to
deliver information before users ask for it. Their
moves suggest that smartphones will evolve into
devices that dispense information unprompted.

The companies are tackling the technology
differently, reflecting their own expertise and
priorities. Apple’s Proactive Assistant, a feature of
its forthcoming iOS 9 software, aims to learn how a
user will behave from information stored on an
iPhone. By contrast, Google Now combs data from a
universe of online services and searches.

“This is a major battleground. The companies are
using this to highlight their strengths,” said Rich
Mogull, the chief executive of the research and
advisory firm Securosis.

Both companies hope the new features, some of which
are expected this fall, will keep their users loyal
and lock them into related services that make money.
For Apple, that means more returning customers for
its iPhones. For Google, it means more engaged users
for its advertisers.
Apple’s iPhone knows which apps you use, when and for
how long. ENLARGE
Apple’s iPhone knows which apps you use, when and for
how long. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg News

In addition, the ability to anticipate what users
want and deliver it at the right moment will be
crucial for such future devices as smart watches and
connected automobiles.

The efforts by Google and Apple are part of a growing
wave of “digital assistants” in the technology
industry aimed at providing a helping hand for
devices. Microsoft Corp. is putting “Cortana,” a
personal-assistant service, in all devices running
Windows software. Amazon.com Inc. ’s virtual
assistant is Alexa, who currently exists inside the
company’s Echo speaker.

At its developers’ conference in May, Google
demonstrated how Google Now can alert a traveler to
airport gas stations when the traveler is returning a
vehicle and may need to fill the tank. Google can
deduce the return time from emails showing the
traveler’s itinerary and real-time departure data
provided by airlines.

For other uses, Google Now, introduced in 2012, taps
Web search and browsing history, Google services such
as Gmail, calendar and YouTube, and data from the
phone such as location, time and app use. The company
says it wants as much information as possible to
produce the most useful recommendations.

“Imagine an assistant who works for you for [only]
one hour a day,” says Aparna Chennapragada, director
of product and engineering for Google Now. “I want my
assistant proactively working for me all the time.”
WSJ.D

WSJ.D is the Journal’s home for tech news, analysis
and product reviews.

Mims: Virtual Reality Isn’t Just About Games
BMW, Daimler and Audi to Buy Nokia’s Here in $3.1
Billion Deal
How Do You Corral a Drone? Give It a Leash
Tech Firms Beware: Don’t Disappoint Investors

Apple takes a more conservative approach, limiting
itself to information gathered on the phone. The
company says the iPhone knows which apps you use,
when you use them and for how long. It also knows
where you are and with whom you communicate
regularly. It has access to some emails, but it taps
them sparingly, Apple says, using them to identify
callers or create calendar events, for example.

As a result, Apple can’t replicate some of what
Google Now does. Its upcoming iPhone software will
have a feature called Siri Spotlight that suggests
people to contact based on future meetings or nearby
businesses. It will also find gas stations once
you’re near the rental-car office, but it won’t send
the information proactively.

So far, Apple has provided one example of when it
would seek information beyond the phone: tapping
real-time traffic data to suggest when to leave for
an upcoming appointment in the phone’s calendar.

Apple’s approach is focused on learning regular
activities. If you listen to music in the morning
while working out, for example, the phone will begin
playing your workout music when you plug in your
headphones in the morning. Apple hasn’t elaborated on
its plans for Proactive Assistant since its
announcement last month.

Apple also distinguishes between what its devices
know and what it as a company knows. Apple says its
device knows a lot about you, but that information is
tethered to the phone and isn’t collected by the company.

Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook has been critical of
companies such as Google that he says are profiting
by selling data on users to advertisers.

Google says it doesn’t sell or share user data with
other companies but uses its information to target ads.

Jamie Davidson, a partner at Redpoint Ventures and a
former Google engineer, says Google’s willingness to
tap a broader swath of data gives the company a leg
up. “It will be harder for Apple to create a
compelling experience without getting more
information from the broader Web beyond the phones,”
he says.

One app developer who works with Google says the
utility of Google Now will vary depending on how much
information a user shares. Those who share more will
get more relevant suggestions, the developer says.
But that benefit must be weighed against the privacy
implications of sharing so much personal information
with the company.

Dylan Russell, a 23-year-old media-studies student at
Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Okla.,
says he regularly uses Google Now on his Motorola
Moto X phone, and he isn’t worried about compromising
his privacy.

“I think it’s something that people are going to get
over,” Mr. Russell says. “It’s not a bad thing for
Google to know me better to help me better.”

On a recent Friday night, Mr. Russell saw that Google
Now had displayed information about local restaurants
and movies playing in a nearby theater. In another
instance, his boss sent him an email reminding him to
make a spreadsheet for a project, and Google Now
created a reminder for him.

“I thought it was super awesome. I didn’t click any
buttons,” says Mr. Russell. “They’re becoming more
like a real personal assistant, knowing you, knowing
what you like to do, and knowing when you like to do it.”

Later this year, Google plans to introduce Google Now
on Tap, which will use text and image recognition to
understand what users are doing inside apps and make
suggestions. It won’t send information proactively,
but it could anticipate the next steps a user may
want to take.

For example, when a friend suggests in a text message
eating dinner at a specific restaurant, Google Now
can bring up an information card with the
restaurant’s Yelp reviews, phone number, schedule and
a map, as well as a link to a booking app like
OpenTable to help secure a table.

Write to Daisuke Wakabayashi at
***@wsj.com and Alistair Barr at ***@wsj.com
Fabian Russell
2015-08-04 22:37:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
“I thought it was super awesome. I didn’t click any
buttons,” says Mr. Russell. “They’re becoming more
like a real personal assistant, knowing you, knowing
what you like to do, and knowing when you like to do it.”
Super awesome? It's a phrase indicative of his retarded demographic
and should cause the DA to switch into idiot mode.

But, anyway, what if the user has multiple personalities or is subject
to frequent mood swings (manic depression)?

I imagine that such cases (and they're not too uncommon) would
cause the DA a bit of confusion as it would repeatedly have to
erase and rebuild its database.

How about Dr. Jeckyl and Mr. Hide? He was an upstanding citizen
by day and a evil psychopath at night. How would his DA anticipate
such conflicting behavior?

It seems Microsoft/Apple/Google have some serious thinking to do.
gilber34
2015-08-04 23:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by unknown
“I thought it was super awesome. I didn’t click any
buttons,” says Mr. Russell. “They’re becoming more
like a real personal assistant, knowing you, knowing
what you like to do, and knowing when you like to do it.”
Super awesome? It's a phrase indicative of his retarded demographic
and should cause the DA to switch into idiot mode.
But, anyway, what if the user has multiple personalities or is subject
to frequent mood swings (manic depression)?
I imagine that such cases (and they're not too uncommon) would
cause the DA a bit of confusion as it would repeatedly have to
erase and rebuild its database.
How about Dr. Jeckyl and Mr. Hide? He was an upstanding citizen
by day and a evil psychopath at night. How would his DA anticipate
such conflicting behavior?
It seems Microsoft/Apple/Google have some serious thinking to do.
they are selling to the younger (idiots) people, that don't have a clue.
A.M
2015-08-05 12:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
http://www.wsj.com/articles/apple-and-google-know-what-you-want-before-you-do-1438625660
Apple and Google Know What You Want Before You Do.
New technology for smartphones will monitor activity
and send information before it is requested; locking
in loyal users.
Apple and Google are preparing new smartphone apps
that will monitor and predict users’ activity and
supply information before it is requested.
By Daisuke Wakabayashi and Alistair Barr
Aug. 3, 2015 2:14 p.m. ET 69 COMMENTS
Apple Inc. and Google Inc. are racing to anticipate
the needs of their users.
The technology giants, whose software runs nearly all
of the world’s smartphones, are adding features to
deliver information before users ask for it. Their
moves suggest that smartphones will evolve into
devices that dispense information unprompted.
The companies are tackling the technology
differently, reflecting their own expertise and
priorities. Apple’s Proactive Assistant, a feature of
its forthcoming iOS 9 software, aims to learn how a
user will behave from information stored on an
iPhone. By contrast, Google Now combs data from a
universe of online services and searches.
“This is a major battleground. The companies are
using this to highlight their strengths,” said Rich
Mogull, the chief executive of the research and
advisory firm Securosis.
Both companies hope the new features, some of which
are expected this fall, will keep their users loyal
and lock them into related services that make money.
For Apple, that means more returning customers for
its iPhones. For Google, it means more engaged users
for its advertisers.
Apple’s iPhone knows which apps you use, when and for
how long. ENLARGE
Apple’s iPhone knows which apps you use, when and for
how long. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg News
In addition, the ability to anticipate what users
want and deliver it at the right moment will be
crucial for such future devices as smart watches and
connected automobiles.
The efforts by Google and Apple are part of a growing
wave of “digital assistants” in the technology
industry aimed at providing a helping hand for
devices. Microsoft Corp. is putting “Cortana,” a
personal-assistant service, in all devices running
Windows software. Amazon.com Inc. ’s virtual
assistant is Alexa, who currently exists inside the
company’s Echo speaker.
At its developers’ conference in May, Google
demonstrated how Google Now can alert a traveler to
airport gas stations when the traveler is returning a
vehicle and may need to fill the tank. Google can
deduce the return time from emails showing the
traveler’s itinerary and real-time departure data
provided by airlines.
For other uses, Google Now, introduced in 2012, taps
Web search and browsing history, Google services such
as Gmail, calendar and YouTube, and data from the
phone such as location, time and app use. The company
says it wants as much information as possible to
produce the most useful recommendations.
“Imagine an assistant who works for you for [only]
one hour a day,” says Aparna Chennapragada, director
of product and engineering for Google Now. “I want my
assistant proactively working for me all the time.”
WSJ.D
WSJ.D is the Journal’s home for tech news, analysis
and product reviews.
Mims: Virtual Reality Isn’t Just About Games
BMW, Daimler and Audi to Buy Nokia’s Here in $3.1
Billion Deal
How Do You Corral a Drone? Give It a Leash
Tech Firms Beware: Don’t Disappoint Investors
Apple takes a more conservative approach, limiting
itself to information gathered on the phone. The
company says the iPhone knows which apps you use,
when you use them and for how long. It also knows
where you are and with whom you communicate
regularly. It has access to some emails, but it taps
them sparingly, Apple says, using them to identify
callers or create calendar events, for example.
As a result, Apple can’t replicate some of what
Google Now does. Its upcoming iPhone software will
have a feature called Siri Spotlight that suggests
people to contact based on future meetings or nearby
businesses. It will also find gas stations once
you’re near the rental-car office, but it won’t send
the information proactively.
So far, Apple has provided one example of when it
would seek information beyond the phone: tapping
real-time traffic data to suggest when to leave for
an upcoming appointment in the phone’s calendar.
Apple’s approach is focused on learning regular
activities. If you listen to music in the morning
while working out, for example, the phone will begin
playing your workout music when you plug in your
headphones in the morning. Apple hasn’t elaborated on
its plans for Proactive Assistant since its
announcement last month.
Apple also distinguishes between what its devices
know and what it as a company knows. Apple says its
device knows a lot about you, but that information is
tethered to the phone and isn’t collected by the company.
Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook has been critical of
companies such as Google that he says are profiting
by selling data on users to advertisers.
Google says it doesn’t sell or share user data with
other companies but uses its information to target ads.
Jamie Davidson, a partner at Redpoint Ventures and a
former Google engineer, says Google’s willingness to
tap a broader swath of data gives the company a leg
up. “It will be harder for Apple to create a
compelling experience without getting more
information from the broader Web beyond the phones,”
he says.
One app developer who works with Google says the
utility of Google Now will vary depending on how much
information a user shares. Those who share more will
get more relevant suggestions, the developer says.
But that benefit must be weighed against the privacy
implications of sharing so much personal information
with the company.
Dylan Russell, a 23-year-old media-studies student at
Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Okla.,
says he regularly uses Google Now on his Motorola
Moto X phone, and he isn’t worried about compromising
his privacy.
“I think it’s something that people are going to get
over,” Mr. Russell says. “It’s not a bad thing for
Google to know me better to help me better.”
On a recent Friday night, Mr. Russell saw that Google
Now had displayed information about local restaurants
and movies playing in a nearby theater. In another
instance, his boss sent him an email reminding him to
make a spreadsheet for a project, and Google Now
created a reminder for him.
“I thought it was super awesome. I didn’t click any
buttons,” says Mr. Russell. “They’re becoming more
like a real personal assistant, knowing you, knowing
what you like to do, and knowing when you like to do it.”
Later this year, Google plans to introduce Google Now
on Tap, which will use text and image recognition to
understand what users are doing inside apps and make
suggestions. It won’t send information proactively,
but it could anticipate the next steps a user may
want to take.
For example, when a friend suggests in a text message
eating dinner at a specific restaurant, Google Now
can bring up an information card with the
restaurant’s Yelp reviews, phone number, schedule and
a map, as well as a link to a booking app like
OpenTable to help secure a table.
Write to Daisuke Wakabayashi at
Disgusting, more spying from Apple and Google.
--
A.M
Odd Bodkin
2015-08-05 13:09:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.M
Disgusting, more spying from Apple and Google.
There are people (usually wealthy) that have personal assistants. These
personal assistants provide essential lubrication in their employers'
lives. The downside of having a personal assistant is that the assistant
knows a great deal about you -- where you go, what your daily routines
are, what your preferences and needs are, where you shop and what you
tend to buy there, who you know closely and who are more removed
acquaintances, and what your schedule is. If you're uncomfortable with
anyone knowing these things without you, then you dispense with a
personal assistant and do everything yourself.

The makers of personal technology -- Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft --
are keenly aware that the majority of their market want some sort of
digital personal assistant, and they want it more than they want their
privacy. So the makers of personal technology are catering to the needs
of their market.

Now, there are certainly some people who feel differently -- that
privacy is more important than having a personal assistant. But these
people are in the minority, and so the onus is on them to reach into the
controls of the technology products and turn off all the invasive
aspects. Basically, if you buy a technology product, you have to
proactively fire your assistant. Of course, some of the capabilities of
the technology product may be compromised by doing so, and that's
another thing you have to accept.
--
Odd Bodkin --- maker of fine toys, tools, tables
HVAC
2015-08-05 13:24:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Odd Bodkin
Post by A.M
Disgusting, more spying from Apple and Google.
There are people (usually wealthy) that have personal assistants. These
personal assistants provide essential lubrication in their employers'
lives. The downside of having a personal assistant is that the assistant
knows a great deal about you -- where you go, what your daily routines
are, what your preferences and needs are, where you shop and what you
tend to buy there, who you know closely and who are more removed
acquaintances, and what your schedule is. If you're uncomfortable with
anyone knowing these things without you, then you dispense with a
personal assistant and do everything yourself.
The makers of personal technology -- Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft --
are keenly aware that the majority of their market want some sort of
digital personal assistant, and they want it more than they want their
privacy. So the makers of personal technology are catering to the needs
of their market.
Now, there are certainly some people who feel differently -- that
privacy is more important than having a personal assistant. But these
people are in the minority, and so the onus is on them to reach into the
controls of the technology products and turn off all the invasive
aspects. Basically, if you buy a technology product, you have to
proactively fire your assistant. Of course, some of the capabilities of
the technology product may be compromised by doing so, and that's
another thing you have to accept.
I'm all in. I give Google, etc, total access to every art of my public
life. I actually pity the poor soul that has to monitor me. The tedium,
the incessant use of tautologies and catchphrases...Even my diet is
boring. And many people would find spending 10-12 hours a day on a boat
fishing as not very exciting. The exciting parts of my life are shielded
from their view by dint of the fact that there are none.
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 14:09:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
I'm all in. I give Google, etc, total access to every art of my public
life. I actually pity the poor soul that has to monitor me. The tedium,
the incessant use of tautologies and catchphrases...Even my diet is
boring. And many people would find spending 10-12 hours a day on a boat
fishing as not very exciting. The exciting parts of my life are shielded
from their view by dint of the fact that there are none.
It's all done by algorithms. You are identified buy your computer,
habits, purchases, everything you have ever searched for or looked
at, ISPs, IP addresses, etc.

One thing I like about Apple is the encryption of mobile devices,
messages, FaceTime calls and banking transactions. Apple makes most
of its money selling hardware. Whereas Google, Facebook and some
make their money advertizing to you and selling your data.

But, don't take my word for it -- research it for yourself, just in
case you think I harbor any biases. :-)
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
HVAC
2015-08-05 15:03:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by HVAC
I'm all in. I give Google, etc, total access to every art of my public
life. I actually pity the poor soul that has to monitor me. The tedium,
the incessant use of tautologies and catchphrases...Even my diet is
boring. And many people would find spending 10-12 hours a day on a boat
fishing as not very exciting. The exciting parts of my life are shielded
from their view by dint of the fact that there are none.
It's all done by algorithms. You are identified buy your computer,
habits, purchases, everything you have ever searched for or looked
at, ISPs, IP addresses, etc.
One thing I like about Apple is the encryption of mobile devices,
messages, FaceTime calls and banking transactions. Apple makes most
of its money selling hardware. Whereas Google, Facebook and some
make their money advertizing to you and selling your data.
But, don't take my word for it -- research it for yourself, just in
case you think I harbor any biases. :-)
I willingly give Google et al access to my 'life'. I enjoy targeted ads
over random ads. Now bear in mind that I live two 'lives'. One that is
public...The Harlow Campbell 'life'.

My other life is clandestine. That's really all you need to know about
it. And when people look for me, I vanish in a cloud of smoke and they
are left looking for a mystery wrapped in a conundrum.

Looked for I cannot be seen

Listened for I cannot be heard

Felt for I cannot be touched

I am vaporware in cyberspace

I am a rumor of a myth
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 15:10:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
My other life is clandestine. That's really all you need to know about
it. And when people look for me, I vanish in a cloud of smoke and they
are left looking for a mystery wrapped in a conundrum.
And then there is:
On-Demand Satellites Can Shoot High-Def Video of Your Car
Post by HVAC
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/on-demand-satellites-can-shoot-high-def-video-of-your-car/
Pictures from high above Earth’s surface, on display at a New York
City press conference in June, were startling not just because of
their high definition but because they added a new dimension to
satellite imagery—time. The images took the form of videos that
showed individual cars moving on highways.
The company behind the images, start-up firm UrtheCast, had a pair of
cameras installed on the Russian side of the International Space
Station last year and plans to add two more to the U.S. side. At the
press conference, UrtheCast announced the coming launch—currently
scheduled for later this summer—of an on-demand satellite imagery
service that will include video.
UrtheCast, based in Vancouver, is just one of a host of small
companies set to provide more frequent and more extensive coverage of
Earth’s surface from orbit than has ever been available. The new
services are driven by smaller and more capable sensors and other
electronics, cloud computing services and reductions in launch costs.
UrtheCast, for example, paid exactly nothing for launch. It got its
first cameras on the space station in exchange for providing
exclusive rights to imagery of Russia to Moscow.
Other companies are taking advantage of lower-cost launch services
offered by companies like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX to send up
constellations of imaging satellites. Even as UrtheCast released its
videos of major world cities, BlackSky Global announced its plan for
a constellation of 60 low-flying imaging satellites, with the first
to be launched next year. These companies are joined by Skybox
Imaging—which was acquired by Google for $500 million last
year—Planet Labs, and DigitalGlobe.
May our days (and nights) be cloudy.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
HVAC
2015-08-05 15:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by HVAC
My other life is clandestine. That's really all you need to know about
it. And when people look for me, I vanish in a cloud of smoke and they
are left looking for a mystery wrapped in a conundrum.
On-Demand Satellites Can Shoot High-Def Video of Your Car
Post by HVAC
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/on-demand-satellites-can-shoot-high-def-video-of-your-car/
Pictures from high above Earth’s surface, on display at a New York
City press conference in June, were startling not just because of
their high definition but because they added a new dimension to
satellite imagery—time. The images took the form of videos that
showed individual cars moving on highways.
The company behind the images, start-up firm UrtheCast, had a pair of
cameras installed on the Russian side of the International Space
Station last year and plans to add two more to the U.S. side. At the
press conference, UrtheCast announced the coming launch—currently
scheduled for later this summer—of an on-demand satellite imagery
service that will include video.
UrtheCast, based in Vancouver, is just one of a host of small
companies set to provide more frequent and more extensive coverage of
Earth’s surface from orbit than has ever been available. The new
services are driven by smaller and more capable sensors and other
electronics, cloud computing services and reductions in launch costs.
UrtheCast, for example, paid exactly nothing for launch. It got its
first cameras on the space station in exchange for providing
exclusive rights to imagery of Russia to Moscow.
Other companies are taking advantage of lower-cost launch services
offered by companies like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX to send up
constellations of imaging satellites. Even as UrtheCast released its
videos of major world cities, BlackSky Global announced its plan for
a constellation of 60 low-flying imaging satellites, with the first
to be launched next year. These companies are joined by Skybox
Imaging—which was acquired by Google for $500 million last
year—Planet Labs, and DigitalGlobe.
May our days (and nights) be cloudy.
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
HVAC
2015-08-05 15:30:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by HVAC
My other life is clandestine. That's really all you need to know about
it. And when people look for me, I vanish in a cloud of smoke and they
are left looking for a mystery wrapped in a conundrum.
On-Demand Satellites Can Shoot High-Def Video of Your Car
Post by HVAC
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/on-demand-satellites-can-shoot-high-def-video-of-your-car/
Sam, do you understand that the adaptive optics used in modern astronomy
was developed by our friends at DARPA for military spy satellites?

I breathe a bit easier knowing that I have the entire might of US space
command covering my back. Don't you?


Oh and PS, clouds do not hide our enemy's evil actions from the watchful
view of good ol' Uncle Sammy.
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 15:34:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
Post by Sam Wormley
Post by HVAC
My other life is clandestine. That's really all you need to know about
it. And when people look for me, I vanish in a cloud of smoke and they
are left looking for a mystery wrapped in a conundrum.
On-Demand Satellites Can Shoot High-Def Video of Your Car
Post by HVAC
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/on-demand-satellites-can-shoot-high-def-video-of-your-car/
Sam, do you understand that the adaptive optics used in modern astronomy
was developed by our friends at DARPA for military spy satellites?
I breathe a bit easier knowing that I have the entire might of US space
command covering my back. Don't you?
Oh and PS, clouds do not hide our enemy's evil actions from the watchful
view of good ol' Uncle Sammy.
I am quite aware.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
I am a rumor of a myth
You harass women for sex and, when that fails,
you rent whores. Mystery solved.
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 13:51:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Odd Bodkin
So the makers of personal technology are catering to the needs
of their market.
So it would seem.

But the rise of that pseudo-science known as "data mining" has transformed
personal information into a commodity. Gullible businesses everywhere are
always seeking some magical tool to increase profits and the software
companies are more than willing to offer their pseudo-product, known
as targeted advertising, to the highest bidder.

The DA can also be seen as just another way to acquire this salable
information.

The objection is that this resource of information is being acquired
at no cost to the software companies. The user is not being compensated
for his relinquishment of personal data. It's like the free advertising
obtained by some businesses when they install, without the owners permission,
license plate frames containing a commercial message on someones automobile.
Through this seemingly innocent practice, a particular business can
have its name broadcast throughout a given area at no cost to them.

The users, therefore, are being exploited more than they are being served.
In many ways, these useful tools such as DA's are no different than
root kits or malware.
Odd Bodkin
2015-08-05 14:56:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Odd Bodkin
So the makers of personal technology are catering to the needs
of their market.
So it would seem.
But the rise of that pseudo-science known as "data mining" has transformed
personal information into a commodity. Gullible businesses everywhere are
always seeking some magical tool to increase profits and the software
companies are more than willing to offer their pseudo-product, known
as targeted advertising, to the highest bidder.
The DA can also be seen as just another way to acquire this salable
information.
The objection is that this resource of information is being acquired
at no cost to the software companies. The user is not being compensated
for his relinquishment of personal data. It's like the free advertising
obtained by some businesses when they install, without the owners permission,
license plate frames containing a commercial message on someones automobile.
Through this seemingly innocent practice, a particular business can
have its name broadcast throughout a given area at no cost to them.
The users, therefore, are being exploited more than they are being served.
In many ways, these useful tools such as DA's are no different than
root kits or malware.
You're absolutely right the user is not being compensated for access to
personal data. This is precisely the business model for facebook,
Google, and now Microsoft. The revenue stream for those providers is
based almost entirely on targeted advertizing. In exchange for the
information you WILLINGLY provide by subscribing to their service, they
do not charge you for the service. GMail, Google Maps, basic Google
Drive, Google Doc apps, YouTube, and all the other Google services are
free in the sense that you don't fork over money. You fork over
information about you, and other companies pay Google for the
information you've forked over.

Microsoft has joined that model with Windows 10. You will never pay for
a Windows operating system again in your lifetime. It will be upgraded
regularly for free. There will no longer be a significant revenue stream
associated with the sale of Windows 10. In exchange, you are forking
over information that Windows 10 is empowered to collect, and you agree
to it by clicking Agree on the Terms of Use.
--
Odd Bodkin --- maker of fine toys, tools, tables
HVAC
2015-08-05 15:32:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Odd Bodkin
You're absolutely right the user is not being compensated for access to
personal data. This is precisely the business model for facebook,
Google, and now Microsoft. The revenue stream for those providers is
based almost entirely on targeted advertizing. In exchange for the
information you WILLINGLY provide by subscribing to their service, they
do not charge you for the service. GMail, Google Maps, basic Google
Drive, Google Doc apps, YouTube, and all the other Google services are
free in the sense that you don't fork over money. You fork over
information about you, and other companies pay Google for the
information you've forked over.
As they say, if it's free, *YOU* are the item for sale.
Post by Odd Bodkin
Microsoft has joined that model with Windows 10. You will never pay for
a Windows operating system again in your lifetime. It will be upgraded
regularly for free. There will no longer be a significant revenue stream
associated with the sale of Windows 10. In exchange, you are forking
over information that Windows 10 is empowered to collect, and you agree
to it by clicking Agree on the Terms of Use.
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 18:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Odd Bodkin
This is precisely the business model for facebook,
Google, and now Microsoft.
The disgusting thing about it all is that these businesses are now the
LARGEST CORPORATIONS in the USA. They supplant GM, US Steel, and even
Exxon.

Our society is being sustained by personal information brokers. What
a joke.
Apollyon
2015-08-05 18:11:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Odd Bodkin
This is precisely the business model for facebook,
Google, and now Microsoft.
The disgusting thing about it all is that these businesses are now the
LARGEST CORPORATIONS in the USA. They supplant GM, US Steel, and even
Exxon.
Our society is being sustained by personal information brokers. What
a joke.
http://www.dailydot.com/technology/megan-smith-cto-google/
In her new position as White House CTO, Smith will work with the Office of Science and Technology Policy on applying her considerable experience in the tech industry to everything from job creation to broadband Internet access.
Snit
2015-08-05 17:10:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by A.M
Post by unknown
http://www.wsj.com/articles/apple-and-google-know-what-you-want-before-you-do
-1438625660
Apple and Google Know What You Want Before You Do.
New technology for smartphones will monitor activity
and send information before it is requested; locking
in loyal users.
Apple and Google are preparing new smartphone apps
that will monitor and predict users¹ activity and
supply information before it is requested.
By Daisuke Wakabayashi and Alistair Barr
Aug. 3, 2015 2:14 p.m. ET 69 COMMENTS
Apple Inc. and Google Inc. are racing to anticipate
the needs of their users.
The technology giants, whose software runs nearly all
of the world¹s smartphones, are adding features to
deliver information before users ask for it. Their
moves suggest that smartphones will evolve into
devices that dispense information unprompted.
The companies are tackling the technology
differently, reflecting their own expertise and
priorities. Apple¹s Proactive Assistant, a feature of
its forthcoming iOS 9 software, aims to learn how a
user will behave from information stored on an
iPhone. By contrast, Google Now combs data from a
universe of online services and searches.
...
Post by A.M
Disgusting, more spying from Apple and Google.
With Apple the info comes from your phone and stays on your phone. Apple
gets very little if any of it. Unlike Google and MS they are making it very
public how little data they are collecting from you.

Frankly I am happy to see that.
--
* OS X / Linux: What is a file?

* Mint MATE Trash, Panel, Menu:

* Mint KDE working with folders:

* Mint KDE creating files:

* Mint KDE help:

* Mint KDE general navigation:

* Mint KDE bugs or Easter eggs?

* Easy on OS X / Hard on Linux:

* OS / Word Processor Comparison:

Mahipal
2015-08-04 23:30:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by gilber34
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going to start spying on us with
the comera as of Win10! Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
Start spying? Start?! He he... I needed a good laugh. Thanks.
Post by gilber34
Post by Fabian Russell
Windows 10 gives Microsoft a direct data link to the user machine.
Data in droves of all kinds will be automatically transfered to
Microsoft servers on a regular basis -- unless the user shuts
it off one by one during install and during a post-install configure.
I tried getting the new MSOFFICE 2016 for Mac earlier today. Major
hyped, what you've always been waiting for, changes finally made!
Yet... Though the website accurately identified me by name {Hello
Mahipal}, I don't remember signing in however, it said my account was
incapable of downloading the new SW. Open new account, MS site
insisted?! I left the site.
Post by gilber34
Post by Fabian Russell
They ain't fooling around this time. Windows 10 makes the user
a part of Microsoft's local network.
The Cloud, it's not just a choice, there's no DVD players on new Macs.
Post by gilber34
is that true ?
If you have to ask...
Post by gilber34
WSJ today had article that Apple and Google are going to be doing that
with their cellphones
Going to be? That's one way to make the ever persistent BREAKING NEWS.

Ask this of self: Is your CPU or #smartestphone really off when you
turn it off? When you put electrical tape over the camera, or mike, do
the(y)TheThem send drones to watch you for your own ...youKnow Safet(y)?

-- Mahipal 'If you wanted not to be stalked, I mean tracked, then you
ought not have been born Buddy. Just pray, you do not become prey.'
HVAC
2015-08-05 12:05:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mahipal
Ask this of self: Is your CPU or #smartestphone really off when you
turn it off? When you put electrical tape over the camera, or mike, do
the(y)TheThem send drones to watch you for your own ...youKnow Safet(y)?
Why would you even care if 'they' are tracking you? Personally I like
the feeling that someone is watching over me. Don't you?
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
Mahipal
2015-08-05 16:50:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
Post by Mahipal
Ask this of self: Is your CPU or #smartestphone really off when you
turn it off? When you put electrical tape over the camera, or mike, do
the(y)TheThem send drones to watch you for your own ...youKnow Safet(y)?
Why would you even care if 'they' are tracking you? Personally I like
the feeling that someone is watching over me. Don't you?
Watching over you HVAC would be a painful job. No pain, no gain?

Let me count the ways why I care. From One too Infinity. One will do.

No Third-Party, in the name of selling me life or health insurance, or
a mobilephone, giving an entire shit that I happened to buy only one
and not theirs particular brands, has any right or priviledge to scan my
past's shopping habits, to establish that I like Golf and play Tennis,
and enjoy a vodka martini after. Nobody's business.

If I have nothing to hide, then I'm a sweet cuddly innocent USA human!
Yeah, sure, right. Ok, so who is Stalking they the them Stalkers? I
assume you've seen the recent set of police events where
theyTheWatchers go out of their way to cover up the actual events. If
not, go pay attention.

Some father shot down a drone recently, for it was stalking his
daughter who happened to be sunbathing in her backyard. Where would
those videos be posted? They arrested the father, not the drone's
owner stalker. Justice my ass.
Post by HVAC
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!
http://youtu.be/FZcG5UOY224
-- Mahipal
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 18:00:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVAC
Why would you even care if 'they' are tracking you? Personally I like
the feeling that someone is watching over me. Don't you?
No, you don't.

If within every brick-and-mortar store that you entered there was a
mysterious stranger closely following you around the aisles and making
detailed notes about your activities, you would *not* like it.

If there was an eavesdropper lurking around your home and peeking
over the fence or trying to peer into windows at all hours of the
day, you also would *not* like it.

Well, the same god-damned thing is happening in the digital universe,
and, if you truly understood the nature of it all, you certainly
would not approve.
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going
to start spying on us with the comera as of Win10!
Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
I'm watching you right now.
In fact, I can smell you ! (Just kidding)

"Cortana", Win10’s built-in personal digital assistant,
scans your emails, appointments, and Web searches.

I'd turn it off.

Go to "Settings" (Control Panel?),
then click on the "Privacy" button.

There, it says:

Don’t want personalized ads inside apps?
Turn it off by sliding the button to Off.

Turn off: "Typing and writing" (autoComplete).

And so on, lots of Cortana crap, turn it off.
gilber34
2015-08-04 21:36:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going
to start spying on us with the comera as of Win10!
Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
I'm watching you right now.
In fact, I can smell you ! (Just kidding)
"Cortana", Win10’s built-in personal digital assistant,
scans your emails, appointments, and Web searches.
I'd turn it off.
Go to "Settings" (Control Panel?),
then click on the "Privacy" button.
Don’t want personalized ads inside apps?
Turn it off by sliding the button to Off.
Turn off: "Typing and writing" (autoComplete).
And so on, lots of Cortana crap, turn it off.
article on WSJ today on how Apple and Google are scanning your CELLPHONE
data and use, supposedly to get ads to you, but can identify you, your
habits, location etc, and project what they think you should be doing.

apple on iPhone, and Google on android phones,
Double-A
2015-08-05 00:16:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going
to start spying on us with the comera as of Win10!
Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google?
Do you know about that?
I'm watching you right now.
In fact, I can smell you ! (Just kidding)
"Cortana", Win10's built-in personal digital assistant,
scans your emails, appointments, and Web searches.
I'd turn it off.
Go to "Settings" (Control Panel?),
then click on the "Privacy" button.
Don't want personalized ads inside apps?
Turn it off by sliding the button to Off.
Turn off: "Typing and writing" (autoComplete).
And so on, lots of Cortana crap, turn it off.
Do you have any experience with Ubuntu?

Double-A
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Double-A
Do you have any experience with Ubuntu?
No, but Richard Stallman (the top GNU guy) says: <<

When the user searches her own local files
for a string using the Ubuntu desktop,
Ubuntu sends that string to one of Canonical's servers.
( Canonical is the company that develops Ubuntu. ) >>

"Ubuntu Spyware: What to do?":
https://www.fsf.org/blogs/rms/ubuntu-spyware-what-to-do
Fabian Russell
2015-08-05 03:47:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Double-A
Do you have any experience with Ubuntu?
Ubuntu, like many other distributions geared to the masses,
is not pure Linux. It is Linux overlain with custom software
utilities that potentially can do anything.

The only way to get pure Linux is to roll your own distro
( http://www.linuxfromscratch.org ) or use something that
is highly configurable like Gentoo ( https://www.gentoo.org ).

It's much easier than you would perhaps think, and there are
many folks on the forums willing to help.

I use a customized Gentoo Linux and I have complete, total,
and unequivocal control of my system. I know exactly what
is happening at all times. I can never be compromised,
monitored, or tracked by anything ever.

For me, that's the way it will always be.

My MS Windows boxen are almost the same as I modify them
heavily (disable services, alter registry entries, etc.).
But there is still a lot that I don't understand about MS
Windows and because it is a closed source OS I will never
fully trust it.

On any OS, however, there is one thing to always be concerned
about and that is the Internet browser. Virtually all browsers
are bloated monstrosities that attempt to do everything for
the user and such open-ended versatility is always potential
trouble. There is little choice available but there is some
hope:

http://www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/


I can't understand why a browser can't be just a simple, unadorned
wrapper for the rendering engine.

When in doubt, which is often, I will use Links in graphical mode:

http://links.twibright.com
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 14:11:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
I use a customized Gentoo Linux and I have complete, total,
and unequivocal control of my system. I know exactly what
is happening at all times. I can never be compromised,
monitored, or tracked by anything ever.
With that attitude you are an excellent target to be compromised.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
Sam Wormley
2015-08-05 13:55:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Double-A
I heard something about that Microsoft was going to start spying on us with the comera as of Win10! Or was it the mike? Both? Or was it Google? Do you know about that?
Double-A
I know of several paranoid people with tape over the camera's on
their computers. These same people never bothered to find out where
the microphone(s) is(are).

On of those people started deleting fundamental pieces of their
computer's operating system, saying, "I never use that". It was
pretty crippled when I got to it and installed a new operating
system.
--
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.
Mahipal
2015-08-05 00:44:40 UTC
Permalink
"Jeff-Relf.Me" wrote in message news:Jeff-***@Aug.4{11.31A.Seattle.2015}...

Fabian_Russell, The Start Menu was born out of research
into how to teach monkey's <---

Apostrophe's and they're use's, you fucking idiot.
Mahipal
2015-08-05 01:01:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by unknown
Fabian_Russell, The Start Menu was born out of research
into how to teach monkey's <---
Apostrophe's and they're use's, you fucking idiot.
I, Mahipal, wrote none of the above. Some stalker enjoys being me.
Below is proof, sort of, that above post is not from me.
Look at the NNTP-Posting-Host. SW and ISPs suck.

-- Mahipal

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From: "Mahipal" <***@gmail.com>
Newsgroups: sci.physics
Subject: Re: Replacing Win10's Start Menu.
Date: Tue, 4 Aug 2015 17:44:40 -0700
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"Jeff-Relf.Me" wrote in message news:Jeff-***@Aug.4{11.31A.Seattle.2015}...

Fabian_Russell, The Start Menu was born out of research
into how to teach monkey's <---

Apostrophe's and they're use's, you fucking idiot.
chrisv
2015-08-04 19:34:13 UTC
Permalink
*plonk*
unknown
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Indirectly, you (chrisv) see my posts.

I know because you publicly plonk those who quote me,
over and over again.
HVAC
2015-08-05 10:54:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fabian Russell
Post by unknown
I prefer Win8 because, unlike Win10, it has no Start Menu.
The Start Menu was specifically created by Microsoft, at great expense,
to accommodate mental retards.
This is an undeniable historic fact. Microsoft commissioned psychological
experts ($$$) to observe the behavior of test subjects representing the common
user, i.e. retards. After intensive study the conclusion was that a
"Start" button or menu was essential in allowing access for the common
user, i.e. retards.
So what's Jeffie, the retard, gonna do without his Start Menu? He will,
like all retards, just sit there and stare at the empty screen with his
mouth hanging open while drooling all over his shirt.
I kinda like this Fabian dude. He has a way with words.
--
Cut off one head, two more shall take its place.
HAIL HYDRA!

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