Discussion:
Singularities and Black Holes
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o***@gmail.com
2019-09-07 21:20:56 UTC
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Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/

Quote--

First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019

A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.

Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.

--End Quote


sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
j***@specsol.spam.sux.com
2019-09-07 22:15:17 UTC
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***@gmail.com wrote:

Not a damn thing but the less than worthless google posting ass hole did
post a bunch of unformatted text containing non ASCII characters copied
without permission from some web site containing yet more off topic crap
about astronomy to a physics group instead of to one of the many astronomy
groups.
Post by o***@gmail.com
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics
Right, not astronomy, not weather, not geology, not material science, but
physics.
--
Jim Pennino
Mitch Raemsch
2019-09-08 01:14:20 UTC
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There is only one singularity. It is the hypersphere center.
God creates.

Mitchell Raemsch
whodat
2019-09-08 03:36:11 UTC
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Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
In other words, an admission that a black hole depends on a
"singularity" that, at the present time, is not and cannot be
defined in specific terms but we're pretty sure they ex
Mitch Raemsch
2019-09-08 04:05:32 UTC
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Post by whodat
Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
In other words, an admission that a black hole depends on a
"singularity" that, at the present time, is not and cannot be
defined in specific terms but we're pretty sure they exist.
Not really. That Gravity is ending space and time... so how can
a black hole continue move? God creates. Those singularities
don't exist.

Mitchell Raemsch
Chris M. Thomasson
2019-09-08 08:03:12 UTC
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Post by Mitch Raemsch
Post by whodat
Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
In other words, an admission that a black hole depends on a
"singularity" that, at the present time, is not and cannot be
defined in specific terms but we're pretty sure they exist.
Not really. That Gravity is ending space and time... so how can
a black hole continue move? God creates. Those singularities
don't exist.
Swarms of Black holes can orbit other black holes, and end up consuming
one another, or merging if you will. An example is a super cluster,
think along the lines of the gre
whodat
2019-09-08 21:21:02 UTC
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Post by Mitch Raemsch
Post by whodat
Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
In other words, an admission that a black hole depends on a
"singularity" that, at the present time, is not and cannot be
defined in specific terms but we're pretty sure they exist.
Not really. That Gravity is ending space and time... so how can
a black hole continue move? God creates. Those singularities
don't exist.
Mitchell
Mitch Raemsch
2019-09-08 22:30:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mitch Raemsch
Post by whodat
Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
In other words, an admission that a black hole depends on a
"singularity" that, at the present time, is not and cannot be
defined in specific terms but we're pretty sure they exist.
Not really. That Gravity is ending space and time... so how can
a black hole continue move? God creates. Those singularities
don't exist.
Mitchell Raemsch
Are you brain damaged?
There are no black holes.
A point of ending space time cannot move in space time...
God creates.

Mitchell Raemsch
john
2019-09-11 15:12:54 UTC
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whodat
“Are you brain damaged? ”
Amazing, isn’t it? And still smarter than you
whodat
2019-09-11 15:34:08 UTC
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Post by john
whodat
“Are you brain damaged? ”
Amazing, isn’t it? And still smarter than you
And it only took you days to discover that street punk "wisdom?"
Be more careful who you deem to be a god.

So you're incapable of learning physics?
john
2019-09-11 18:56:28 UTC
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whodat

So you're incapable of learning physics? ’

Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
Mitch Raemsch
2019-09-11 19:02:12 UTC
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Post by john
whodat

So you're incapable of learning physics? ’
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
If space time ends black holes could not move in the universe...
And there is No Absolute Rest... NO BHs...
God creates.

Mitchell Raemsch
reber G=emc^2
2019-09-11 20:22:13 UTC
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Post by Mitch Raemsch
Post by john
whodat

So you're incapable of learning physics? ’
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
If space time ends black holes could not move in the universe...
And there is No Absolute Rest... NO BHs...
God creates.
Mitchell Raemsch
Look out Mitch its its Allah day (9/11).Its a God smiting day.Best you keep in mind that BHs .Black matter.Black light were all created by the Devel in black hell,bert
Odd Bodkin
2019-09-11 19:03:28 UTC
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Post by john
whodat

So you're incapable of learning physics? ’
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
For John,
Nonsense = anything that I haven’t figured out on my own
--
Odd Bodkin — Maker of fine toys, tools, tables
Odd Bodkin
2019-09-11 19:06:09 UTC
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Post by Odd Bodkin
Post by john
whodat

So you're incapable of learning physics? ’
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
For John,
Nonsense = anything that I haven’t figured out on my own
Note that for John, conservation of momentum is nonsense.

He has thought through it, decided that it cannot possibly be right, and
therefore anyone who supports the idea of conservation of momentum is lost,
unthinking, sheeple.
--
Odd Bodkin — Maker of fine toys, tools, tables
Michael Moroney
2019-09-11 19:19:14 UTC
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Post by john
whodat
"
So you're incapable of learning physics? "
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
Why won't you ever tell us *why* it is 'nonsense'? You always say that but never
demonstrate it.
Odd Bodkin
2019-09-11 20:01:02 UTC
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Post by Michael Moroney
Post by john
whodat
"
So you're incapable of learning physics? "
Believing in nonsense, you mean? Yes.
Why won't you ever tell us *why* it is 'nonsense'? You always say that but never
demonstrate it.
It’s nonsense because if you can’t show it as a drawing or animation of
interconnected parts then it’s automatically nonsense. That’s John’s view,
anyway.
--
Odd Bodkin — Maker of fine toys, tools, tables
john
2019-09-11 20:24:04 UTC
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MM
“Why won't you ever tell us *why* it is 'nonsense'? You always say that but never
demonstrate it. ”
Ostriches can’t see for the same reason.
You want to believe nonsense
Odd Bodkin
2019-09-11 21:51:47 UTC
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Post by john
MM
“Why won't you ever tell us *why* it is 'nonsense'? You always say that but never
demonstrate it. ”
Ostriches can’t see for the same reason.
You want to believe nonsense
Or another way John thinks of it: “You won’t pay any attention to MY idea,
and so you’re sticking your head in the sand, and therefore your idea is
nonsense.”

See? John has lots of little phrases, repeated endlessly, but he doesn’t
like to just come out and say what he really thinks about it.
--
Odd Bodkin — Maker of fine toys, tools, tables
whodat
2019-09-11 23:24:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Odd Bodkin
Post by john
MM
“Why won't you ever tell us *why* it is 'nonsense'? You always say that but never
demonstrate it. ”
Ostriches can’t see for the same reason.
You want to believe nonsense
Or another way John thinks of it: “You won’t pay any attention to MY idea,
and so you’re sticking your head in the sand, and therefore your idea is
nonsense.”
See? John has lots of little phrases, repeated endlessly, but he doesn’t
like to just come out and say what he really thinks about it.
john sez: "look Maw, I got some real science guys to play wif me. And
you sez I'd never amount to nuttin. Haw Haw, gotcha Maw! Ain't I cool?"
reber G=emc^2
2019-09-08 22:46:35 UTC
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Post by o***@gmail.com
Singularities and Black Holes
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/spacetime-singularities/
Quote--
First published Mon Jun 29, 2009; substantive revision Wed Feb 27, 2019
A spacetime singularity is a breakdown in spacetime, either in its geometry or in some other basic physical structure. It is a topic of ongoing physical and philosophical research to clarify both the nature and significance of such pathologies. When it is the fundamental geometry that breaks down, spacetime singularities are often viewed as an end, or “edge”, of spacetime itself. Numerous difficulties, however, arise when one tries to make this notion more precise. Breakdowns in other physical structures pose other problems, just as difficult. Our current theory of spacetime, general relativity, not only allows for singularities, but tells us that they are unavoidable in some real-world circumstances. Thus we apparently need to understand the ontology of singularities if we are to grasp the nature of space and time in the actual universe. The possibility of singularities also carries potentially important implications for the issues of physical determinism and the scope of physical laws.
Black holes are regions of spacetime from which nothing, not even light, can escape. A typical black hole is the result of the gravitational force becoming so strong that one would have to travel faster than light to escape its pull. Such black holes generically contain a spacetime singularity at their center; thus we cannot fully understand a black hole without also understanding the nature of singularities. Black holes, however, raise several additional conceptual problems and questions on their own. When quantum effects are taken into account, black holes, although they are nothing more than regions of spacetime, appear to become thermodynamical entities, with a temperature and an entropy. This seems to point to a deep and hitherto unsuspected connection among our three most fundamental theories, general relativity, quantum field theory and thermodynamics. It is far from clear, however, what it may mean to attribute thermodynamical properties to black holes. At the same time, some of these thermodynamical properties of black holes now seem amenable to direct testing in terrestrial laboratories by observing the behavior of “analogue” systems composed of ordinary material. This all raises problems about inter-theory relations, in particular about relations between the “same” quantity as it appears in different theories. It also bears on the meaning and status of the Second Law of thermodynamics, with possible implications for characterizing a cosmological arrow of time.
--End Quote
sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated to the discussion of physics, news from the physics community, and physics-related social issues.
BHs take away both space and time in both realms.Nobel thinking at its best bert
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