Discussion:
H2O Polarity is Collectively Variable (by James McGinn of Solving Tornadoes)
(too old to reply)
James McGinn
2018-03-12 18:31:26 UTC
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I dunno, guys.
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.

Also, all increments in-between are relevant. In other words, there is a
continuum between being polar (individualistic) and nonpolar (collectivized)
and water's properties change accordingly in a dramatic manner. For example,
along the surface of water the H2O molecules are more individualistic (for
obvious reasons) than those below the surface. Consequently the molecules
along the surface of water are more polar. The increased polarity along the
surface is what creates H2O's much heralded "surface tension." (This also
happens on submerged surfaces, which is instrumental to H2O being a solvent.)
Wouldn't gaseous H2O be like little magnets floating around minding
their own business?
Again, Yes and No. Individually, Yes. They are like little magnets.
Collectively, No. Because collectively they neutralize each other's polarity.
The reason they neutralize each other's polarity is due to a phenomena I refer
to as Incidental Symmetry. I will soon be releasinv a video entitled,
Incidental Symmetry: The Solution to H2O's Anomalies. This understanding will
revolutionize our conceptualization of H2O's place in nature.

This is a major breakthrough.

BTW, in case anybody is wondering. I actually am an atmospheric physicist and
I actually am the number one expert on this planet in storm theory and I
actually am the number one expert on the anomalies of H2O and their resolution
and I am perfectly aware that this is a run on sentence.

Read this:
Reflection on Daniel Eltons Dissertation on Water
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=16601

James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by James McGinn
I dunno, guys.
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.
Such water would have the boiling point near -120 deg C.

BTW, show us other extremely nonpolar material with such high
relative permitivity...
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
James McGinn
2018-03-12 19:29:25 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by James McGinn
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.
Such water would have the boiling point near -120 deg C.
This is true. (I think even lower, like -160 deg C.) And this proves two things: 1) Something happens with water at 0 deg C. that activates polarity (actually, I know exactly what *it* is and it actually begins to happen at 4 deg C as temperature drops); and 2) the notion that H2O arranges itself into highly symmetrical lattices to form ice is bull shit.

It also indicates that almost everything modern sciences "knows" about H2O is based on fundamentally flawed theory.
Post by Libor Striz
BTW, show us other extremely nonpolar material with such high
relative permitivity...
Frickin pay attention, you simpleton. I'm not saying H2O is nonpolar. I said
liquid H2O is nonpolar and that H2O has variable polarity. How the fuck did
you miss this? Are you retarded?

By the way, H2O's relative permittivity is only one of about 70 recognized
anomalies of H2O.
Claudius Denk
2018-03-12 21:52:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Libor Striz
Post by James McGinn
I dunno, guys.
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.
Such water would have the boiling point near -120 deg C.
Clearly McGinn indicated that H2O's polarity is variable. How freekin stupid must you be to not have noticed that.
James McGinn
2018-03-13 05:52:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Libor Striz
Post by James McGinn
I dunno, guys.
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.
Such water would have the boiling point near -120 deg C.
BTW, show us other extremely nonpolar material with such high
relative permitivity...
Pay attention. I did not say H2O is nonpolar. I said its polarity is variable.
Claudius Denk
2018-03-12 21:18:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by James McGinn
I dunno, guys.
Is H2O polar?
Yes and No. Individually (ie. gaseous H2O) Yes, it is polar--extremely polar.
Collectively (pooled liquid water) No, it is non-polar--extremely nonpolar.
Also, all increments in-between are relevant. In other words, there is a
continuum between being polar (individualistic) and nonpolar (collectivized)
and water's properties change accordingly in a dramatic manner. For example,
along the surface of water the H2O molecules are more individualistic (for
obvious reasons) than those below the surface. Consequently the molecules
along the surface of water are more polar. The increased polarity along the
surface is what creates H2O's much heralded "surface tension." (This also
happens on submerged surfaces, which is instrumental to H2O being a solvent.)
Wouldn't gaseous H2O be like little magnets floating around minding
their own business?
Again, Yes and No. Individually, Yes. They are like little magnets.
Collectively, No. Because collectively they neutralize each other's polarity.
The reason they neutralize each other's polarity is due to a phenomena I refer
to as Incidental Symmetry. I will soon be releasinv a video entitled,
Incidental Symmetry: The Solution to H2O's Anomalies. This understanding will
revolutionize our conceptualization of H2O's place in nature.
This is a major breakthrough.
BTW, in case anybody is wondering. I actually am an atmospheric physicist and
I actually am the number one expert on this planet in storm theory and I
actually am the number one expert on the anomalies of H2O and their resolution
and I am perfectly aware that this is a run on sentence.
Reflection on Daniel Eltons Dissertation on Water
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=16601
James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
I guarantee that nobody else in this NG is going to understand what you are saying here. What you are saying makes perfect sense. But the participants in this NG are incapble of this kind of reasoning. There are some very, very low bandwith individuals that populate this NG. They have a hard time holding two thoughts in their heads at the same time. Anything that can't be looked up on Wikipedia is completely beyond these nitwits.
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