Discussion:
Cold Steam: The superstition persists
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James McGinn
2017-01-30 05:07:36 UTC
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On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

Chan:
Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
sci.physics.research:
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ

Question from sci.physics.research:
"We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
(ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"

James McGinn:
I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
handful of psycho-metrist.

Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
case--once again.

Cold Steam: The superstition persists

Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.

Believer believe. Scientist reason.

James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
James McGinn
2017-02-11 16:27:48 UTC
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On Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 9:07:38 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
>
> Chan:
> Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
> sci.physics.research:
> https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ
>
> Question from sci.physics.research:
> "We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
> (ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
> there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
> supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"
>
> James McGinn:
> I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
> have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
> that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
> temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
> handful of psycho-metrist.
>
> Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
> important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
> The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
> steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
> case--once again.
>
> Cold Steam: The superstition persists
>
> Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
> evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.
>
> Believer believe. Scientist reason.
>
> James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
James McGinn
2017-02-13 17:49:05 UTC
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On Saturday, February 11, 2017 at 8:27:50 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> On Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 9:07:38 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> > On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> >
> > Chan:
> > Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
> > sci.physics.research:
> > https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ
> >
> > Question from sci.physics.research:
> > "We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
> > (ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
> > there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
> > supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"
> >
> > James McGinn:
> > I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
> > have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
> > that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
> > temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
> > handful of psycho-metrist.
> >
> > Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
> > important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
> > The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
> > steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
> > case--once again.
> >
> > Cold Steam: The superstition persists
> >
> > Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
> > evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.
> >
> > Believer believe. Scientist reason.
> >
> > James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
James McGinn
2017-05-17 23:24:55 UTC
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On Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 9:07:38 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
>
> Chan:
> Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
> sci.physics.research:
> https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ
>
> Question from sci.physics.research:
> "We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
> (ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
> there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
> supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"
>
> James McGinn:
> I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
> have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
> that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
> temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
> handful of psycho-metrist.
>
> Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
> important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
> The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
> steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
> case--once again.
>
> Cold Steam: The superstition persists
>
> Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
> evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.
>
> Believer believe. Scientist reason.
>
> James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
James McGinn
2017-06-13 15:54:10 UTC
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Raw Message
On Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 9:07:38 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
>
> Chan:
> Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
> sci.physics.research:
> https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ
>
> Question from sci.physics.research:
> "We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
> (ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
> there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
> supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"
>
> James McGinn:
> I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
> have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
> that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
> temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
> handful of psycho-metrist.
>
> Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
> important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
> The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
> steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
> case--once again.
>
> Cold Steam: The superstition persists
>
> Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
> evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.
>
> Believer believe. Scientist reason.
>
> James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes
James McGinn
2018-02-12 15:24:07 UTC
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Raw Message
On Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 8:54:13 AM UTC-7, James McGinn wrote:
> On Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 9:07:38 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> > On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:50:05 AM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:
> >
> > Chan:
> > Don't laugh at James McGinn; it was a genuine question asked in
> > sci.physics.research:
> > https://groups.google.com/d/msg/sci.physics.research/QOxLdbhLwQ0/TVKql-ReCQAJ
> >
> > Question from sci.physics.research:
> > "We all know that water is a fluid unless the temperature is below freezing
> > (ice) or above boiling (steam). Yet according to the psychometric chart
> > there is water as a gas in the atmosphere at temperatures at which water is
> > supposed to be in liquid form. How come?"
> >
> > James McGinn:
> > I suppose it comes down to who you want to trust. On the one hand you
> > have hundreds of thousands of scientist working over hundreds of years
> > that have established the steam tables that explain the boiling/freezing
> > temperatures/pressures of H2O, on the other hand you have, well, a
> > handful of psycho-metrist.
> >
> > Of course having a funny name doesn't make you wrong. But having an
> > important sounding name doesn't mean you know how to do real science.
> > The only fact that matters in all of this being whether or not it, cold
> > steam, was detected empirically. And it appears to not have been the
> > case--once again.
> >
> > Cold Steam: The superstition persists
> >
> > Belief in cold steam is like belief in ghosts. There is a lot of
> > evidence of ghosts--all anecdotal. Same for cold steam.
> >
> > Believer believe. Scientist reason.
> >
> > James McGinn / Solving Tornadoes

Answer the question you fucking troll.
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