Discussion:
Polarity Neutralization Implication of Hydrogen Bonds Between Water Molecules and Groups Thereof
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Solving Tornadoes
2014-11-16 00:18:45 UTC
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There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.

So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .

http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
Mica Choo
2014-11-16 03:10:18 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that
are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be
contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists
between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for
the fluidity and gentle character of water.
what is gentle character ?
Post by Solving Tornadoes
Others draw attention to
the high boiling point of H2O,
Who are "Others", name them. Or are you just making stuff up ?

<snipbongdreams>
Post by Solving Tornadoes
In liquid
water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent.
prove it. you are wrong, again.
Post by Solving Tornadoes
In
the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by
each H2O molecule is high.
"emitted surface tension" by a gas. Prove it. (yes, you Wrong a third
time in one post) you dont know what it means.


post your work here, and we will grade you.


<snip malware link>
Howard D
2014-11-16 03:43:38 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that
are shared between water molecules in water.
There is no confusion, if they shared hydrogen bonds or electrons as in
metals, then pure water would be highly conductive, it is not, and in
pure form an insulator. Case closed.
Poutnik
2014-11-16 11:15:56 UTC
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.......... it is also reflected
in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy)
that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface
tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase
of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
.......

Why to learn what is surface tension, if you can just guess ?
Why to learn anything at all, if all can be just guessed ?

I do not expect anything but offences from ST,
what is common behaviour of people without clue.
--------

Surface tension is related to change of Gibbs energy of system,
related to change of area of liquid phase border.

It is caused by non zero net force,
acting on molecules of liquid phase at boundary level,
as one hemisphere of surrounding molecules is missing.

As result, smaller the droplet, easier is for single molecule
to escape then from flat surface.

This is also a cause, why droplets of ALL liquids have higher tension of
vapours,
compared to flat liquid surface at the same conditions.
As their escape is partially powered by decrease of surface.

Surface tension has no physical sense for single molecules.

Surface tension can be expressed as energy per area,
or force per length. Liquid water has about 70 mN /m,
resp. 70 mJ / sq m,
what is several time more than for majority of other liquids.
--
Poutnik
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-17 22:30:27 UTC
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you rock the aquacosmos
Post by Poutnik
Surface tension can be expressed as energy per area,
or force per length. Liquid water has about 70 mN /m,
resp. 70 mJ / sq m,
what is several time more than for majority of other liquids.
--
Poutnik
Poutnik
2014-11-18 05:27:27 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
you rock the aquacosmos
Why ? It is basic of physical chemistry,
but some people take it as a "rocket science".
Post by S***@hotmail.com
Post by Poutnik
Surface tension can be expressed as energy per area,
or force per length. Liquid water has about 70 mN /m,
resp. 70 mJ / sq m,
what is several time more than for majority of other liquids.
--
Poutnik
--
Poutnik
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-18 23:32:40 UTC
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energy per area is
the area of the unit-sphere (pi divided into ...
Post by Poutnik
Surface tension can be expressed as energy per area,
or force per length. Liquid water has about 70 mN /m,
resp. 70 mJ / sq m,
what is several time more than for majority of other liquids.
--
Poutnik
Poutnik
2014-11-19 05:56:07 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
energy per area is
the area of the unit-sphere (pi divided into ...
It is taught in basic school....
--
Poutnik
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-19 18:13:16 UTC
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pi d d is the area,
energy per unit area is therefore pi ... some thing
Poutnik
2014-11-19 18:25:14 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
pi d d is the area,
If you mean a sphere, then S = 4 pi r^2 = pi d^2
Post by S***@hotmail.com
energy per unit area is therefore pi ... some thing
..is Joule per square metre.
pi is unitless.
--
Poutnik

A wise man guards words he says,
as they may say about him more, than he says about the subject.
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-20 01:47:39 UTC
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pi is not really unitless
;it depends upon whether you are using a)
circumference to diameter, or b)
area to diameter;
I like to use pith,
the reciprocal of pi
Post by Poutnik
..is Joule per square metre.
pi is unitless.
--
Poutnik
A wise man guards words he says,
as they may say about him more, than he says about the subject.
Poutnik
2014-11-20 06:24:58 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
pi is not really unitless
;it depends upon whether you are using a)
circumference to diameter, or b)
area to diameter;
Are you kidding ?

L = pi . d
[m] = [1] . [m]

S = pi/4 d^2
[m^2] = [1] . [m^2]
--
Poutnik
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-21 23:48:47 UTC
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there are two pis, although one is restricted of flatland,
so the ratio of circumference to diameter is secondary
;the real pi is dpid (volumetrically,
dpidd/6. it is also interesting
to relate the flat pi with the round pi
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-25 02:15:21 UTC
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key is just Gauss's developments of curvature
(small kappa, firstly
for one & two dimensionality, and secondly
for basketballs ... soccerballs ... futbols
Post by S***@hotmail.com
to relate the flat pi with the round pi
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-25 18:45:06 UTC
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can use tetragonal meters, but
Post by Poutnik
..is Joule per square metre.
pi is unitless.
--
Poutnik
A wise man guards words he says,
as they may say about him more, than he says about the subject.
S***@hotmail.com
2014-11-26 00:52:53 UTC
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yes, use either a)
tetrahedral meters, or b)
spherical meters
Post by S***@hotmail.com
can use tetragonal meters, but
Solving Tornadoes
2016-03-21 22:28:03 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
yes, use either a)
tetrahedral meters, or b)
spherical meters
can use tetragonal meters, but
Sarnox
2014-11-20 15:07:48 UTC
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Post by S***@hotmail.com
energy per area is
the area of the unit-sphere (pi divided into ...
Post by Poutnik
Surface tension can be expressed as energy per area,
or force per length. Liquid water has about 70 mN /m,
resp. 70 mJ / sq m,
what is several time more than for majority of other liquids.
--
Poutnik
just energy per surface area, pi less
no hemisphere or solid angle involved, no per sr, steradian

neat number for surface tension
Solving Tornadoes
2016-06-07 05:07:58 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .
http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
Solving Tornadoes
2017-02-04 01:16:46 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .
http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
Solving Tornadoes
2017-10-18 18:10:15 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .
http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
James McGinn
2017-10-27 03:23:44 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .
http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
James McGinn
2018-03-12 23:18:19 UTC
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Post by Solving Tornadoes
There is a lot of confusion about implications of hydrogen bonds that are shared between water molecules in water. There seems to be contradictory messages. Some have described the bonds that exists between H2O molecules in liquid water as very weak, thus allowing for the fluidity and gentle character of water. Others draw attention to the high boiling point of H2O, it being much higher than that of its two constituents hydrogen and oxygen. Moreover, this dichotomy is not only evident in the strength of the hydrogen bonds between H2O molecules, it is also reflected in the surface tension (the residual electromagnetic energy) that is produced by H2O molecules. In liquid water this surface tension is very slight, almost nonexistent. In the gaseous phase of water, steam, the surface tension emitted by each H2O molecule is high.
So then, which is it? Are the hydrogen bonds that exist between water molecules weak and is their surface tension slight or are the hydrogen bonds strong and the surface tension they emit strong? It can't be . . .
http://wp.me/p4JijN-9l
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